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Puppy Insurance: What You Need To Know
22.02.24 February 22, 2024 Getting A Puppy Featured

Puppy Insurance: What You Need To Know

Introduction Puppy insurance is an essential and important part of the pet ownership journey that gives owners peace of mind that should the worst happen, their pup is protected. Simply put, pet insurance exists to help owners looking to protect their canine companions from unexpected health issues and the associated costs of veterinary care. Much like health insurance for us humans, puppy insurance like that offered by our friends over at Waggel, covers a range of treatments, surgeries and medications that may be needed throughout your puppy’s life. Taking out a puppy insurance policy is just one of the many ways you can protect your pet and ensure they’re being cared for in the best way possible. Whilst puppy insurance protects your pet from accidents and illnesses, treating your pup to the best pet products is sure to contribute to their health and wellbeing too. This means making sure your pup is welcomed home in true style with high-quality pet products that are made to last - like those from Lords & Labradors. Why Puppy Insurance Matters Pet insurance is particularly crucial during a puppy's early years when they are more susceptible to accidents, illnesses and the development of unforeseen health conditions. Many owners push the thought of insurance from their minds and think that because their pet is young, they’re unlikely to experience any issues. Sadly, this couldn’t be further from the truth. By investing in puppy insurance, you can ensure that you’re consistently providing the best possible care for your furry friend without the worry of facing overwhelming veterinary fees and bills. Without an insurance policy in place, you risk having to pay substantial fees if your pet were suddenly to become ill or involved in an accident. During a time of stress and upset, who would want to be worrying about vet bills? Without the added stress of paying hundreds or even thousands for treatment, you can focus on what’s most important, helping your dog get back to optimal health. Vet fees can quickly add up and can become a financial burden in a time of anxiety. From surgery costs to medication and x-rays, an insurance policy in place for your pup can give you added peace of mind during times of uncertainty ultimately meaning you’ll have one less thing to worry about. When it comes down to it, we all want what's best for our pets and our love for them means that we’ll always choose the best things for them, whether this be premium pet insurance or premium pet products. Being a pet owner means going one step beyond to ensure our furry friends are living the life they truly deserve. Understanding Puppy Insurance Puppy insurance is a pet insurance policy that can be taken out when a dog is as young as 8 weeks old. Most insurers require puppies to be 8 weeks old before they are eligible for an insurance policy simply because this is the youngest they can be separated from their littermates and mother. Separating a puppy from their litter too early can cause them to exhibit fear, anxiety and reactivity which is something no prospective owner wants for their new addition. Insuring your puppy from 8 weeks means that they’ll be protected as soon as they join your family. Doing this early on in your puppy’s life means you can avoid pre-existing condition exclusions often put in place by insurance providers to ensure you aren’t claiming on a condition your pet already had before you took out your policy. To break it down, if your pup was insured from 8 weeks old and suddenly at 2 years old developed a health condition that required veterinary care, you’d be able to claim for treatment relating to the condition for the entirety of your dog’s life as long as you remain with the same insurer, pay your monthly premiums and have a Lifetime policy in place. However, if you waited until your puppy became an adult and then tried to claim on something they suffered with as a puppy when they weren’t insured, this would be classed as pre-existing and means your claim will likely be declined leading to more stress in an already worrisome situation. At Waggel, they’re all about making insurance simple and do so by only offering one type of policy, Lifetime. A Lifetime policy means that you can continue to claim for any conditions your dog may develop throughout their entire life, as long as you renew your policy each year. When purchasing a puppy, some owners are offered temporary pet insurance policies that protect their pet as they settle into their new home. They are often offered by breeders with the purchase of a puppy and don’t involve handing over any bank details. The catch is that they’re not a long-term solution and expire automatically after 4 weeks. Switching to a Lifetime insurance policy, like that provided by Waggel, can eliminate any potential complications and ensure your puppy is protected from as young as 8 weeks old leaving no time for pre-existing conditions to develop. Types Of Puppy Insurance Waggel offers Lifetime policies only for one simple reason; because they’re the most comprehensive. Though they’re considered one of the more expensive types of pet insurance, Lifetime policies offer peace of mind to owners who can continue to claim for the same condition year after year as long as their policy stays active. Waggel also offers flexibility by allowing you the ability to adjust your Annual Coverage and Excess each year to suit your financial needs. There are, however, other types of puppy insurance available such as maximum benefit, time-limited and accident-only policies. Maximum benefit puppy insurance policies refer to a mid-level type of cover for injuries, accidents and illnesses. With a maximum benefit policy in place, you can continue to claim per condition up to a pre-specified limit. Once this limit is reached, you won’t be able to claim for the condition anymore until it resets or the policy is renewed. Time-limited policies may seem more affordable than Lifetime and maximum benefit but they can be limiting in terms of what they offer. Essentially, they allow you to claim for conditions your dog has developed up to a timed limit. Once this timeframe has passed, you’ll be unable to claim. It’s commonly used for short-term illnesses and injuries, though health conditions can be unpredictable and reappear at any time throughout your dog’s life. With a time-limited policy in place, it’s unlikely you’d be able to claim for the same condition again which can be worrying for many owners. Accident-only policies are considered one of the more cost-effective forms of pet insurance simply because they only cover treatment and medical expenses related to accidents. Whilst this may be tempting for new pet owners who haven’t experienced ownership before, pets are very unpredictable and can develop health conditions at any point during their lifespan which an accident-only plan is unlikely to cover. For peace of mind, flexibility and continuous protection year after year, a Lifetime policy is sure to provide everything your pet needs and more. What Puppy Insurance Can Cover So, you’ve decided to take out puppy insurance but what’s really included in your policy? Most comprehensive policies like Lifetime and maximum benefit include coverage for veterinary fees such as diagnostics, surgery, medication and procedures, third-party liability in the event your dog is involved in a legal matter for which you’re deemed legally responsible, and the purchase price if your pet passes away, is stolen or goes missing. All of the above can go a long way in providing your pup with the best start to life. Some policies go even further, like Waggel’s Lifetime policies that also include dental and travel cover for pet owners. Dental health is a very important aspect of canine health and shouldn’t be overlooked. As a pet owner, it’s your responsibility to ensure your dog’s teeth are annually checked and deemed healthy by a vet. Your vet will be required to note down on their records that your puppy’s teeth are in optimal health in order for you to submit a dental-related claim in the future. Without a record of good dental health, insurers will be unable to determine the original condition of your dogs when they were young. With travel cover included as part of your policy, you can rest assured that your puppy is protected even when you’re both out of the country. Waggel offers coverage for emergency treatment when you’re on holiday outside of the UK and within a country of the Pet Travel Scheme for up to 90 days each year. No one wants to think of a time when their pet isn’t here anymore, especially in the excitement of bringing home a puppy. However, as a pet owner it’s something you want to know is covered during a time of sadness. When searching for pet insurance, it’s a good idea to look for policies that include death cover and benefits such as coverage for the purchase price of your pet if they pass away from an accident or illness. Exclusions In Puppy Insurance Whilst we wish puppy insurance covered everything, there are some things that are excluded. As mentioned above, most pet insurance providers exclude pre-existing conditions from policies which is why it’s so important to get your pet insured as soon as possible. Other things that aren’t typically covered in puppy insurance policies include routine, preventative and cosmetic treatments. Routine treatments such as vaccinations and flea and worm treatment are typically excluded as insurers focus on specific treatments instead. This also means you’ll be unable to claim for the cost of neutering or spaying your puppy. Fortunately, lots of vets have health plans in place which, by paying a monthly cost, can help you secure discounts for routine and elective treatments. Health plans often work in conjunction with pet insurance policies so you can continue to get the best price for treatment and protection for your pet at the same time. Conclusion Puppy insurance is a vital part of pet ownership that can ensure your pet is protected from as little as 8 weeks old. Choosing the right kind of policy is important as you want to ensure you get the most comprehensive kind of coverage. We recommend Lifetime insurance like that offered by Waggel as it includes cover for things such as vet fees and dental treatment. Insuring your puppy early means you can skip the worry of pre-existing conditions and rest easy knowing you can claim back the cost of treatment for any condition your dog may face in the future. Taking care of your new addition also extends beyond insurance and includes incorporating high-quality pet products from Lords & Labradors. To ensure your new furry friend gets the best start to life, why not explore Lifetime policies and get a free, no-obligation quote from Waggel? As a Waggel member, you’ll have access to an exclusive membership platform where you can book free vet, behaviour and nutrition consultations. So, when they say they’ve got your back, they really mean it. Once your insurance policy is live you can gain immediate peace of mind knowing your pet is protected for life. And if you’re thinking of celebrating this little win, why not explore even more premium pet products with Lords & Labradors offering comfort and luxury for your dog throughout every phase of their life?

By Megan Willis

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How To Get A Puppy Used To Fireworks
30.10.23 October 30, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

How To Get A Puppy Used To Fireworks

We are well into the Autumn season; summer has passed, and the red leaves are falling. This only means one thing; Guy Fawkes night is just around the corner and not long after is Guy Fawkes Night. Whilst we’re enjoying a pumpkin spice latté and deciding where to go and watch the fireworks, we mustn’t forget the furry members of the family. However, the lead up to Bonfire Night can be difficult season for many dogs. All the uproarious blasts and blazes made by fireworks and bonfires can be terrifying for them, making them stressed and anxious, possibly putting their wellbeing in danger. It is important to consider your canines best interests on Bonfire Night – especially if it's their first one. Puppies are likely to be more scared than they have ever been, due to the unfamiliar and potentially frightening sounds and sights. But there are ways to introduce them to fireworks before November 5th and prepare them. We thought we’d give you our tops tips for keeping your pets safe and calm at this noisy time of year, as well as recommending our top calming products.   Why are dogs scared on bonfire night? Bonfire Night can be a troubling time for many dogs. With the constant loud bangs and bright flashes, it is understandable why some dogs can be so frightened by the evening. Here are some of the main reasons why dogs are likely to be scared because of fireworks: Loud explosive noises – Dogs have an extremely acute sense of hearing, much more so than humans. The loud bangs and crackles that fireworks bring are even louder to your pup and likely to be extremely alarming! Bright flashes – Fireworks also make bright flashes at a usually dark time of day. This is unfamiliar to dogs and they may become scared at this. Can make your dog feel trapped – Fireworks are a difficult thing to escape, especially on Bonfire Night. Your dog may be likely to try to run away or hide, however they will struggle to escape them and may feel frightened or anxious. A feeling of the unknown and unpredictability – Bonfire Night to your dog, is just another, normal evening. The unpredictability of bangs and flashes is likely to cause restlessness and potentially act out of character.   Can you get a puppy used to fireworks? The best time to get your dog used to fireworks is when they are a puppy – as a dog who has already experienced a bonfire night in their life may already be frightened by the loud sounds and bright flashes. Preparing your pup begins now – you can start by turning up the noise on the television to gradually ease them into louder noises and bangs, especially during action scenes with frequent loud bangs. Once your pup is more used to that try recordings of firework displays to prepare them for the real thing. However, if your pet suffers from noise phobia or is quite anxious, the proposed preparation may worsen their situation.    What to do with dogs on bonfire night When dogs feel scared or anxious, they will look to find a space where they can try to relax and feel comfortable. The place they choose will likely be a dark place with one entrance to hide away from the loud bangs from fireworks. At Lords & Labradors, we understand that sometimes your dog will feel scared, especially on Bonfire Night! This is one of many reasons why we recommend a Lords & Labradors Crate Set for your pup! It provides the perfect escape and hiding place for them to find comfort and shelter when they are feeling anxious or scared.   How to keep a puppy calm during fireworks? The loud noises and bright flashes that fireworks bring can be an anxious time for anyone – so put yourself in your puppies’ position, scared will likely be an understatement. There are ways in which you can distract and calm your dog through their fears: Distraction from the loud noises via radio or TV – this can soften the loud bangs of the fireworks which should soften the fright for your pup. Anti-anxiety kits and products for dogs – here at L&L we understand that your dog may, from time to time, struggle with high levels of anxiety or fright. We offer a range of products perfect for situations such as Bonfire Night, where your dog or puppy is likely to be scared. Do not tell your dog off – it is important not to scare or upset your dog further than they already are. Try to act as normal as possible, sending your pup positive signals in the process by acting calm and happy. Do not take your dog to a firework display – Even if you think your dog will not be phased by fireworks or a bonfire, is it really worth taking the risk. A loud noise or bright flash could be enough to spook them into running away from you in a panic. Ensure they don’t have access to leave the front door – sounds a straightforward thing to say to some dog owners, but the strange noises and flashes of light that bonfire night brings could be enough to scare your dog into bolting to escape via the front door. If you need to open your front door, we advise shutting your dog in another room whilst doing so to ensure the highest level of safety.   How to help a puppy when fireworks are going off Preparing your Dog for Guy Fawkes Night is difficult. The unfamiliarity of the evening could cause high levels of stress and anxiety for your four-legged friend. However, there are some ways in which you can best prepare to try and make the evening as stress free for your canine: Walk in advance – Walking your dog in advance will ensure they have ample opportunity to relieve themselves before becoming scared by fireworks. Tiring them out may also help them relax more later in the evening.  Feed in advance – Feeding your dog before any expected fireworks would be advised, as an anxious or scared dog may not want to eat. Ensure their water bowl is filled – Anxious dogs are likely to pant, drool and generally be thirstier. Regular checking their water bowl will ensure they have a drink available. It may be worth encouraging them to drink throughout the evening as they may forget due to fear. Shut curtains and blinds – This will ensure any bright flashes are minimalised which could lead to scaring your pup. Double check the security of your garden – Letting your dog out to relieve themselves whilst fireworks are going off may be necessary, especially for puppies. Making your garden secure will ensure your dog can not escape in an attempt to run away from the loud explosions and bright flashes.  Anti-anxiety and calming products – At Lords & Labradors we understand that your dog may need something extra to support them through scary and anxious moments. Our range of anti-anxiety and calming products ensure that your dog will be calmer through traumatic evenings such as Bonfire Night.   Time to check your dog's microchipping details? The Autumn can bring a variety of occasions that can spook your canine friend, especially Halloween and Bonfire Night. It makes early October the perfect time to check you dogs microchip details, and ensure they are wearing their collar with ID tag as often as possible. Loud noises and unfamiliar sights that occasions like Bonfire Night bring (with fireworks) are likely to be things that could spook your pup into attempting to run away. We know that the last thing any pet owner wants to do is lose their pet – but ensuring that their details are up to date will best prepare you for that worst case scenario and help you find them just in case they do go missing!    Top Dog Calming Products To Use On Bonfire Night Woof & Brew Anxious Hound Herbal Tonic - This healthy tonic for dogs is a great daily supplement for anxious or nervous dogs and is ideal to give them before stressful situations such as fireworks. It's a special blend, rich in vitamins and minerals, best served over food or in their water. Each bottle has approximately 60 servings (please read the label for serving details).  Beaphar Cani Comfort Collars - The Beaphar CaniComfort Collars are great at relaxing your dog, they use pheromone technology to help calm your dog. Pheremones are one of the ways dogs communicate, the Dog Appeasing Pheromone (DAP) is naturally produced by mums when they are feeding their puppies. These collars contain a replica of the DAP which is familiar to all dogs so are instantly calming for all dogs. The collars are effective for up to four weeks so are perfect for over the Halloween and Bonfire festivities. The collar can have effects in as little as 15 minutes but we recommend putting it on a day or two before Halloween in case anyone has any early fireworks go off, simply fit the collar around your dog’s neck, fasten and cut off the excess. Perfect for calming and providing reassurance to your dog in what can be a scary time of year for our four-legged-friends. Calming Anti-Anxiety Donut Beds - Here at Lords & Labradors we design our products specifically with your dog’s needs in mind, our faux-fur donut beds are perfect for reducing your dog’s anxiety. The plump soft walls of the donut beds have been designed to cocoon your dog to sleep and help calm them. They come in the softest faux-fur fabric so are perfect for snuggling in.  Pet Remedy All-in-one Calming Kit  - There are a number of different options in the Pet remedy range including plug-in diffusers and room sprays. Pet Remedy contains a host of natural oils that de-stress and calm nervous pets. Our favourite product is the All-in-One Calming Kit that includes a room spray, plug-in diffuser and calming wipes. All the things you could need to help keep your pet calm through the celebrations. We hope you enjoy the festivities of the season. If you have a pet and you're concerned about their anxiety levels, don't panic! Try one of the solutions above and do your best to keep them feeling secure. If you have any questions about this article, or any other topic, do get in touch. You can chat to us via the Chat link on the bottom right hand side of our website, email sales@lordsandlabradors.co.uk or call us on 01790 720900.    

By Megan Willis

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How to Get Your Puppy to Sleep Through the Night: A Comprehensive Guide
09.10.23 October 09, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

How to Get Your Puppy to Sleep Through the Night: A Comprehensive Guide

Welcoming a new puppy into your home is an exciting and joyous occasion. However, the first few nights can be a challenging time for both you and your furry friend. Puppies are known for their boundless energy and curiosity, which can make it difficult for them to settle down and sleep through the night. But fear not! With the right strategies and a little patience, you can help your puppy establish a healthy sleep routine. In this guide, we'll explore effective techniques to ensure your puppy gets a restful night's sleep, allowing you to do the same. Understanding Your Puppy's Sleep Patterns Before we dive into the tips and tricks for a peaceful night's sleep, it's crucial to understand your puppy's natural sleep patterns. Puppies, like human infants, have shorter sleep cycles and may wake up more frequently during the night. This behaviour is entirely normal and usually diminishes as your puppy grows older. On average, puppies need about 18 to 20 hours of sleep per day, but they'll sleep in shorter bursts throughout the day and night.   Establishing a Bedtime Routine Consistency is key when it comes to getting your puppy to sleep through the night. Creating a bedtime routine can help signal to your puppy that it's time to wind down and rest. Here's a simple routine you can follow: Set a regular bedtime: Choose a specific time for your puppy's bedtime and stick to it as closely as possible. This consistency will help regulate their internal clock. Toilet break: Before heading to bed, take your puppy outside for a bathroom break. This helps reduce the chances of nighttime accidents. Quiet playtime: Engage in calm and quiet play with your puppy before bedtime. Avoid overly stimulating activities that could leave them too excited to sleep. Snuffling or puzzle toys are great ways to wear their brains out without getting them too excited. Create a comfortable sleeping area: Ensure your puppy has a comfortable and safe sleeping space. A crate can be an excellent choice, as it provides a sense of security. We recommend setting your puppies crate up with one of our Cosy & Calming puppy crate beds filling half the space and then a piece of vet bed or a puppy pad on the other half. Dim the lights: As bedtime approaches, dim the lights in the room to signal to your puppy that it's time to sleep. The Power of Exercise A tired puppy is more likely to sleep soundly through the night. Make sure your puppy gets plenty of exercise and mental stimulation during the day. Long walks, playtime, and puzzle toys can help tire them out, making it easier for them to settle down at night.   Watch the Water and Food Limit your puppy's water and food intake in the evening to reduce the likelihood of nighttime toilet breaks. However, ensure they have access to fresh water throughout the day to stay hydrated.   Nighttime Comfort To make your puppy's sleeping area as inviting as possible, consider the following: Soft bedding: Provide comfortable bedding inside your puppy's crate or designated sleeping area. Our crate sets are perfect for creating your puppies dream sleep sanctuary. White noise: Some puppies find white noise or soft background music soothing. You can use a white noise machine or a calming playlist to create a peaceful ambiance. Puppy-safe toys: This will depend on your puppy but you could try including a few quiet, puppy-safe toys in the sleeping area to keep your puppy occupied if they wake up during the night, however you may find that this just excited your puppy too much when they’re supposed to be sleeping.   Handling Nighttime Wake-Ups Even with the best efforts, your puppy may still wake up during the night. When this happens: Stay calm: Avoid getting frustrated or upset. Remember that your puppy is still learning. Quietly address their needs: If your puppy needs to go potty, take them out to their designated spot, but do so quietly and without playing or engaging in stimulating activities. Avoid excessive attention: Minimise interaction during nighttime wake-ups to prevent reinforcing the idea that waking up at night is playtime.   Gradual Adjustments As your puppy grows, their ability to sleep through the night will improve. Be patient and understanding during the early months, and gradually, you'll find that your puppy needs fewer nighttime wake-ups.   Helping Older Dogs Sleep Through the Night If you have an older dog that's struggling with nighttime sleep, consider factors like comfort, pain, or anxiety. Consult with your veterinarian to address any potential underlying issues that might be affecting your dog's sleep. In conclusion, getting your puppy to sleep through the night requires consistency, patience, and a well-structured routine. Understanding your puppy's natural sleep patterns and providing a comfortable sleeping environment are essential steps in this process. With time and the right approach, you can help your puppy develop healthy sleep habits, ensuring peaceful nights for both you and your four-legged companion. Sweet dreams to you and your furry friend!

By Megan Willis

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Create Your Ideal Puppy Bedtime Routine
19.09.23 September 19, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

Create Your Ideal Puppy Bedtime Routine

Us humans are creatures of habits, you may not realise you have a ‘bedtime routine’, but you most likely do, which helps wind you down from the day and settle you to a good night’s sleep. Whether this be brushing your teeth and climbing into your softest bedsheets, or reading a few pages of your book, it’s important to create the perfect bedtime routine, so it’s not surprising our puppy’s need a routine too to help them wind down from the day and recognise when ‘bedtime’ also means ‘sleep time’. Here, we have compiled a helpful guide to creating your puppy’s bedtime routine to ensure you both get the best night sleep.   Puppy Bedtime Routine Your puppy may need encouragement to go to sleep, they should eventually settle when they’re tired enough, so you may need to play with them or take them for a walk earlier in the evening to tire them out. Try to start your ‘wind down time’ around 30 minutes before their scheduled bedtime. From this time, avoid playing with them or have them interacting with any stimulating toys that will keep them alert. You may need to separate them from events that would excite them (like bath time if you have children who love to squeal and splash) and giving them a simple chew toy may a better toy to leave them with. Take your puppy out to the toilet just before you’re going to put them to bed. Ensure it is long enough for them to relieve themselves properly before settling down for the night.   Puppy Sleep Routine Once they’ve been to the toilet and settled for the night, choose them a comfortable place to sleep; this may be their bed, in a playpen or a crate. Create the space for your puppy to feel cosy and so they associate relaxing in this space. Ensure the bed is in a low-traffic area of your home so they’ll be undisturbed. Avoid putting any toys in your puppy’s sleep area as you may find they opt for ‘play time’ over ‘sleep time’. Turning the lights out may be a ‘sure sign’ of bedtime, and a habit your puppy will get used to, to feel settled and to recognise the significance of ‘bedtime’. Try to limit the amount of times you switch the lights on and off, so your pup knows once the lights are out – it is sleeping time. If your puppy is struggling to settle why not try one of our crate covers. They're perfect for popping over your puppies crate so it's dark for them and you can roll the doors down to help signal that it's 'sleep time' to get them in a good routine.    Good Bedtime for Puppy Your pup’s bedtime will often be determined by your own routines and plans and will vary depending on the level of exercise your puppy gets and the lifestyle they live with you. Your puppy will generally need about 12 hours of sleep a night, so this may change their bedtime with your morning routines too. Remember your pup needs to sleep throughout the day too! Usually, your puppy should go to bed around 2 hours before you head to bed, it might be useful to take your puppy to the toilet just as you’re heading to bed, so they’ve had another toilet break opportunity, which may help them last longer throughout the night. As tempting as it may seem, try not to let your dog sleep on you on an evening and encourage them sleeping in their bed. Balancing the activity of your pup and how much sleep they need takes time, but you’ll soon learn your puppy’s routine as they learn yours which will make for a seamless night’s sleep!

By Laura Rudd

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How To Get Your Puppy Or Dog To Sleep Alone: Expert Tips And Techniques
07.09.23 September 07, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

How To Get Your Puppy Or Dog To Sleep Alone: Expert Tips And Techniques

Getting your puppy, or even your adult dog, to sleep alone at night is a crucial milestone in their training. Whether you've just welcomed a new furry family member or are struggling with an existing canine companion who insists on sleeping in your bed, this guide will provide you with expert tips and techniques to teach your pet to sleep independently. Say goodbye to sleepless nights and hello to a well-rested, happy pup.   Start Early: Puppy Sleep Training If you have a puppy, it's essential to establish good sleep habits from the beginning. Puppies, like babies, need structure and routine. Start by creating a designated sleeping area for your puppy, preferably in a quiet and dark part of your home. Use a comfortable crate or a cosy dog bed to make them feel secure.   Crate Training Crate training is a highly effective method to teach your puppy or dog to sleep alone. Dogs have a natural denning instinct, and a crate mimics this instinct, providing a safe and secure space for your pet. Here's how to use crate training for better sleep: Introduce the crate gradually: Let your pup explore the crate with positive associations, such as treats and toys. Create a comfortable space: Add soft bedding and a favourite toy to make the crate inviting. Our crate sets are great for creating a cosy den, we've written a guide with everything you need to know about setting up your dog or puppies dream crate.  Gradual confinement: Begin with short intervals and gradually increase the time your pup spends in the crate. We recommend using positive reinforcement training methods, every time your pup goes in their crate give them a treat and some praise so they being to associate the crate as being a positive space. Consistency: Maintain a consistent bedtime routine, putting your pup in the crate at the same time each night. Avoid punishment: Never use the crate as a form of punishment. It should always be a positive and safe space. Positive Reinforcement Reward-based training is a powerful tool in teaching your dog to sleep alone. Use treats, praise, and affection to reinforce good behavior. Here's how to apply positive reinforcement: Bedtime treats: Give your pup a special treat or toy that they only get at bedtime. Praise calm behaviour: Whenever your dog settles down in their designated sleeping area, offer praise and affection. Ignore whining: If your pup whines or cries, wait for a moment of quiet, then reward them with attention. Gradual Transition For dogs accustomed to sleeping in your bed, transitioning them to sleep alone can take time. Make the change gradually by following these steps: Start with the crate: Begin by having your dog sleep in their crate beside your bed. Move the crate: Gradually move the crate farther from your bed over several nights. Encourage independence: Eventually, your dog should be comfortable sleeping alone in their crate or designated sleeping area.   Exercise and Mental Stimulation A tired dog is more likely to sleep soundly through the night. Ensure your pup gets plenty of exercise and mental stimulation during the day. A tired dog is less likely to be restless at night, making the transition to sleeping alone smoother. Interactive puzzle toys are great for wearing your dog's mind out before bed, we love the Nina Ottosson toys for this!    Consistency Is Key Consistency is the cornerstone of successful dog training. Stick to a routine and reinforce positive behaviour consistently. Dogs thrive on predictability, and a consistent sleep routine will help them feel secure and comfortable in their sleeping space.Training your dog or puppy to sleep alone is a process that requires patience, consistency, and positive reinforcement. By following these expert tips and techniques, you can help your canine companion develop good sleep habits, ensuring both you and your furry friend enjoy peaceful nights. Remember, every dog is unique, so tailor your approach to suit your pet's individual needs. With time and dedication, you'll have a well-rested and contented pup who sleeps soundly on their own.

By Megan Willis

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How To Get Your Dog To Calm Down For Bed
07.09.23 September 07, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

How To Get Your Dog To Calm Down For Bed

Ensuring a peaceful bedtime routine for your furry friend is essential for both you and your dog's well-being. If you're struggling with an overexcited pup that won't settle down at bedtime, fear not! In this comprehensive guide, we'll explore expert tips on how to get your dog, whether a seasoned pet or a playful puppy, to calm down for bed. With patience, consistency, and the right techniques, you can transform restless nights into serene slumber for you and your four-legged companion.   Establish a Consistent Routine Dogs thrive on routine. Establishing a regular bedtime routine can help signal to your dog that it's time to wind down. Consistency is key, so try to feed, walk, and go through your evening activities at the same time each night. A predictable routine can create a sense of security, making it easier for your dog to calm down before bed.   Physical Exercise and Mental Stimulation A tired dog is a calm dog. Make sure your dog gets plenty of physical exercise during the day, whether through vigorous walks, playtime at the park, or fetch sessions in the garden. Mental stimulation is just as important, so consider puzzle toys, obedience training, or interactive games to tire your dog's mind. We love the Nina Ottson interactive toys, they're great for keeping your dog's brain busy whilst wearing them out.    Create a Relaxing Environment Make your dog's sleeping area as comfortable as possible. A cosy bed with familiar blankets and toys can provide a sense of security. Consider calming scents like lavender, which can help promote relaxation or a calming diffuser whilst you get your dog into a good sleep pattern. Dim the lights and keep the noise level down to create a serene atmosphere.   Wind Down with Calm Interactions In the hour leading up to bedtime, engage in calm interactions with your dog. Avoid giving your dog stimulating treats, play, or attention right before bedtime. Gradually reduce the intensity of activities leading up to bedtime. Petting, gentle massages, and soft-spoken words can help your dog relax.   Limit Food and Water Before Bed To prevent midnight bathroom trips, avoid feeding your dog a large meal or providing access to water right before bedtime. Gradually decrease food and water intake in the hours leading up to sleep.   Bathroom Breaks Before bedtime, take your dog out for a bathroom break. Ensure they've had ample time to relieve themselves, reducing the likelihood of interruptions during the night.   Consider Crate Training If your dog is still having trouble settling down, consider crate training. A crate can create a cosy, den-like space where your dog feels secure. Gradually introduce your dog to the crate and make it a positive experience with treats and comforting items. Our crate sets are perfect for creating a cosy den. The cushions have a deep hollow fibre filling which is perfect for snuggling up on, the bumper adds a padded wall round the edge of the crate for your dog to rest their head on, and finally the cover blocks out light which will help send your pup to sleep!   Stay Calm and Patient Dogs are sensitive to their owner's emotions. Stay calm and patient when helping your dog calm down for bed. Avoid scolding or showing frustration if they are restless. Positive reinforcement and gentle guidance go a long way. Consult a Professional If your dog's bedtime restlessness persists despite your best efforts, consult a professional dog trainer or a veterinarian. There may be underlying behavioural or health issues that need to be addressed. Getting your dog, whether a puppy or an adult, to calm down for bed requires a combination of consistency, patience, and the right techniques. By establishing a bedtime routine, providing physical and mental stimulation, creating a relaxing environment, and using calming interactions, you can help your furry friend enjoy a peaceful night's sleep. Remember, every dog is unique, so be adaptable and consult a professional if needed to ensure your dog's bedtime routine is as calm and restful as possible. Sweet dreams to both you and your beloved canine companion!

By Megan Willis

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Best Puppy Collars
17.08.23 August 17, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

Best Puppy Collars

Welcoming a new puppy into your home is a joyous occasion that comes with a flurry of responsibilities. One crucial aspect of puppy care is selecting the right collar and lead – a decision that requires careful consideration to ensure your furry friend's comfort, safety, and training success. In this guide, we'll delve into the world of puppy collars, addressing common questions and providing expert advice to help you make an informed choice.   The Journey Begins: Your Puppy's First Collar Your puppy's first collar is a milestone in their development. Most breeders will use a whelping collar whilst your puppy is with them, they come in a variety of colours to help identify the puppies. [product] To ensure a smooth transition, select your puppy’s first collar that is soft, non-restrictive, and lightweight. We love the the Cocopup London collars for tiny puppies due to them being light weight and super adjustable, they also have a solid neoprene padding for extra comfort and support. We recommend gradually introducing the collar to your pup by allowing them to wear it for short periods under supervision until they become accustomed to the sensation, it’s a great activity to start with them from the day you can pick them up so that by the time they can go on walks they are used to their collars   The Adjustable Advantage: Why Opt for an Adjustable Puppy Collar When searching for the best puppy collar, look no further than the adjustable variety. These collars are designed to grow with your pup, accommodating their changing size and ensuring a snug fit throughout their growth stages. The adjustability not only guarantees a comfortable fit but also eliminates the need for frequent replacements as your pup blossoms into a full-grown dog. [product] As we mentioned above we love how adjustable the Cocopup collars are, the Hugo & Hudson collars also have the same great adjustable fit - perfect for puppies   Striking the Perfect Balance: Best Collar and Lead Combo for Puppy Training As you embark on the exciting journey of puppy training, a well-matched collar and lead combo can be your greatest ally. The best collar and leads for puppy training strike a balance between control and comfort. Opt for a collar with sturdy hardware and a lead that allows ample freedom while still enabling you to guide your puppy's movements. Both the Cocopup and Hugo & Hudson collars have matching leads and harnesses which are perfect for puppy training.   Collar vs. Harness: The Debate for Puppies The question of whether a harness is better than a collar for a puppy is a common one. While harnesses distribute pressure more evenly and are ideal for dogs prone to tracheal issues and pulling, collars remain a viable option for many puppies - we recommend trying your puppy with both options to see how they walk best as the best option will vary from dog to dog. When introducing a collar to a puppy, it's crucial to choose one that's lightweight and appropriately sized to prevent discomfort.   Finding the Right Fit: What Size Collar for Your Puppy Determining the right collar size for your puppy requires precision. Measure your puppy's neck circumference and add a small allowance for growth then cross reference with the collars size guide. A collar that's too loose might slip off, while one that's too tight can cause discomfort and potential health issues. Always ensure a two-finger gap between the collar and your puppy's neck for optimal comfort.   When Your Puppy Hates the Collar It's not uncommon for puppies to resist wearing a collar initially. To ease their discomfort, choose a lightweight and soft material. Gradually acclimate your puppy by introducing the collar during enjoyable activities, such as playtime or mealtime, associating it with positive experiences.   Sweet Dreams: Can a Puppy Sleep with a Collar? Puppies can sleep with a collar on, but it's advisable to remove any collars with tags or buckles during bedtime to prevent discomfort. If you prefer your puppy to sleep collar-free, ensure they wear their collar during the day for identification purposes.   Addressing Concerns: Are Collars Bad for Puppies? Collars are not inherently bad for puppies when chosen and used thoughtfully. Select a collar that is lightweight, well-fitted, and comfortable. Avoid leaving collars on unsupervised puppies, and always monitor for signs of irritation or discomfort.   Battling the Itch: When Your Puppy Keeps Itching Their Collar If your puppy consistently scratches or itches their collar, it may just be them getting used to wearing a collar or it could be a sign of irritation or an ill-fitting collar. Check the material for potential allergies, ensure proper fit, and consult your veterinarian if the issue persists.   In Conclusion Selecting the best puppy collar involves careful consideration of your puppy's comfort, training needs, and safety. An adjustable collar that grows with your pup, paired with a suitable lead, can be your perfect training companion. While harnesses offer an alternative, collars can be a great choice when chosen and introduced thoughtfully. Remember that each puppy is unique, so patience and positive reinforcement will go a long way in making collar training a success.

By Megan Willis

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Top 10 Tips First Time Dog Owners Wish They'd Known
21.03.23 March 21, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

Top 10 Tips First Time Dog Owners Wish They'd Known

Bringing a new pup home for the very first time is an exciting and special moment for any family. However, when you’re welcoming a dog into your home, there are a lot of things you need to consider, many of which may not have occurred to you beforehand. From finding the perfect place for your canine to sleep to purchasing the right dog toys to make them feel as comfortable as possible, the list can feel almost endless. Of course, there’re always going to be some things you forget, many of which may be impossible to foresee as they relate to your new furry friend’s individual needs and personality. But in order to make the transition as easy and stress-free as possible for both your family and its new fluffy member, here at Lords & Labradors we turned to our dog-owning social media followers for the top 10 things they wish they had known when they first welcomed a puppy into the family. Spurred on by the chance to win a beautiful doggy hamper worth £100, it’s safe to say our wonderful followers did not disappoint. Here's what we found out... Top 10 Puppy Tips Reading through the hundreds of tips sent in by you, our expert dog-owning followers, it soon became clear that there are three key pieces of advice seasoned dog owners wish they had known prior to welcoming a new pup into the family. These revolve around giving your new four-legged friends plenty of space and letting them settle at their own pace, providing lots of positive encouragement, while also setting boundaries early on, and, of course, showing them lots of love and support right from the get go. While it can be tempting to mollycoddle and overindulge your new dog in an attempt to make them feel welcome and at home, as our competition winner @ted_cockapoo9 (Instagram) stressed, giving them a little space and time to adjust to their new surroundings by themselves can work wonders for their confidence. Similarly, setting boundaries and training your dog early on is critical. From not allowing your pup to go upstairs or sit on the furniture and ensuring they behave when they are left alone in the house, setting boundaries through active obedience and separation training will not only set the right family dynamic, but also improve the bond between you and your canine. 1. Give Your Puppy Space @ted_cockapoo9 points out that giving your new pet a little bit of space when first bringing them home is absolutely key and can help them settle in without feeling stressed or overwhelmed. “Don’t crowd them or try to over-stimulate them - let them have a sniff around at their new surroundings and if they want to lay in their bed, don’t stress. Every pup is different but most appreciate space to explore” 2. Separation Training Urban Paws UK stressed the importance of separation training when you first bring your puppy home “When you leave the house you dog needs to be happy and comfortable with their owner being away. Leaving the dog in a safe room, with a favourite toy and/or treats, will help relate this to a positive experience. Start with 5 minutes and build the time up until the dog is happy to be left on their own” 3. Socialising Your Puppy Hannah Thompson (Dog Trainer and Behaviourist) believes the most important tip to give new dog owners involves ensuring your four-legged friend is properly socialising them with the help of reassuring sounds from the moment they are welcomed into your family. She says “I think the biggest one is socialisation. Making encouraging sounds and playing everyday noises to your puppy from the start whilst they’re doing positive things such as playing and eating can help them settle in and grow up as well adjusted dogs” 4.  Reassure Your Puppy @x_athena_the_frenchie_x highlights that although patience is key and giving your new pup a bit of space is important while they settle into their new surroundings, providing lots of verbal reassurance and gradually introducing them to all other members of the family is also key to making them feel right at home. She says: :Give lots of praise and reassurance, and slowly introduce your pup to their new home. If you have children, explain that a puppy needs to have some quiet time and make sure to place their bed slightly away from the centre of all activity in the room to make sure they are able to sleep when they need it. Also don’t over-stimulate your puppy and remember this is new for them, so there will be accidents aplenty. Patience is key” 5. Research The Breed Sharon Calvert Wormald believes the key to successful dog ownership is selecting the right breed to best suit your family She says “Research the best breed to suit your family and circumstances. If you’re active, it’s better to get a breed which also active, such as a Collie or a Spaniel. If you tend to want to relax more, a mellow breed is better. There’s nothing worse than choosing the perfect looking pooch only to be overwhelmed by their exuberant nature or vice versa” 6. Comforting Your Puppy @sambaird34 points out that making your dog’s new bed as comforting and supportive as possible before their first night’s sleep in your home can make a huge difference in how they settle. He says “For their first night in their own bed, put a tactile toy in with them, preferably something they had been playing with that day. You may also want to put a warm (not hot) water bottle next to them. If they are used to sleeping near their mother, a source of warmth may comfort your pup” 7. Training Your Puppy On And Off The Lead Blair Woods believes you can’t look past training from an early age and socialising your dog with other canines “My tips is something I did do, but I know a lot of people don’t - it’s so important to train your pup from an early age, both on and off the lead. This will allow your dog to mix with other dogs from the puppy stage” 8. Setting Boundaries When it comes to top tips that first time dog owners need to know, @i_am_buddy_boo stresses the importance of creating boundaries and making sure both you and your furry friend stick to them “Even when you feel tempted to let them slip occasionally, creating and sticking to set boundaries is so important! It definitely helps your relationship with the dog and they benefit from having these boundaries” 9. Toilet Training Janis McPhee believes knowing how to properly toilet train your pooch is vital when becoming a first time dog owners. When asked what she wished she had known before welcoming her first pup she she says “Remember to keep the back door open to let the puppy get used to going outside to pee and poo in the early days. Even though it might be cold, it’s worth it and soon the puppy with simply wait at the closed back door when they know nature is calling” 10. Loving Your Puppy Karen Evans offers perhaps the most important piece of advice of all when it comes to welcoming a new canine friend into your family. She simply says: “Love them as they love you” What advice do you wish you had been given before becoming a first-time dog owner? Let us know on social media using the hashtag #landlfriends or message us!

By Zac Girdlestone

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The Top 10 Puppy Essentials
13.01.23 January 13, 2023 Getting A Puppy Featured

The Top 10 Puppy Essentials

You may be preparing for the all important ‘Gotcha Day’, the day celebrated by all dog parents as the day you brought your pup home. Taking your puppy home for the first time is exciting, especially if you have prepared for their arrival. Puppy shopping can be so much fun, but also overwhelming if you’re a new pet parent, or if you’ve not had a puppy for a few years. There will be some things you do need to buy for necessity and some things that are worth buying for your new pup. Here at Lords & Labradors we’ve put together the 10 puppy essentials you’ll need to get your new puppy settled.   Our Top 10 Items To Buy For Your New Puppy 1) What crate to buy? Firstly, if you’ve decided to crate train your puppy, you’ll need a crate that will see you through from puppyhood to adulthood. You’ll need a crate the appropriate size so you can fit a puppy bed at one end and a puppy training pad the other incase they need to toilet when left in their crate. It also gives your pup enough room to stretch, play and sleep if crated during the daytime. Depending on your training methods, you may want to place the crate somewhere the puppy can be near to you, but also not directly in a high traffic area of your home. Remember the crate is your puppy’s den, so discourage any children from climbing inside.   2) Where should my puppy sleep? We recommend a puppy bed that’s easy for your pup to get in and gives them enough support and comfort whilst they sleep. Our Cosy & Calm Puppy Box Beds have been carefully designed with your puppy in mind. The beds are super squishy and soft, and have the most comfortable sides for your pup to snuggle right into. If you have chosen to crate train your pup, our vet bed is really popular, as it’s cosy, comfortable, robust and relatively puppy proof - it’s easily washed and dried too. It can be used with or without our Cosy & Calm puppy box bed.   3) What will my new puppy eat? It’s recommended you initially use the same food that your puppy comes home with, in order to avoid any tummy upset during their first few days with you. Once your puppy has settled, you can gradually introduce a new food to their diet. It’s good to check the food guidelines of the food you choose to feed your pup, as often they’ll give you the correct guidelines on how to introduce the new food to your pup. Make sure you have a clean bowl for water and a clean bowl for food, you can opt for a slanted water bowl if you have a spaniel breed to reduce your dogs ears from getting soaked in their water.   4) Puppy Toilet Training Top of your list should be a reliable pack of puppy training pads, not only are they great for training your young pup, but they are invaluable when travelling (pop in the bottom of their carrier/crate to catch any travel sickness or accidental toilet trips). You can also use them to absorb muddy, wet paws after your pup has had a play in puddles!   5) How to settle my new puppy at night When settling your new puppy at night, our heart beat sheep will be your puppy's new best friend. The heart beat sheep features a beating heart inside that mimics the beat of Mum's heart. They're designed to offer comfort and calm to new puppies who may feel nervous in their new home; they help to stop separation anxiety too. Alongside the heart beat sheep, you could pop in a heat pad under your dogs bed/cushion to keep them warm and to mimic the feeling of having siblings/mum near. Both the heat and the heart beat sheep will provide comfort for your puppy, especially whilst they are settling in and adjusting overnight.   6) How to keep your new puppy entertained Toys will provide something to chew on for your pup, which you’ll find are essential if you want to avoid your puppy chewing on your furniture. Choose a variety of textures, styles and sizes to keep your puppy engaged and interested. You may want to keep a toy box so your pup can choose what they’d like to play with, or keep a few toys in rotation so your puppy doesn’t get bored with them. You can also buy toys you can fill with treats or their food. If you want/need to leave your puppy - remember to build this up slowly, and don’t leave your new puppy for a long period of time - you could try freezing a peanut butter filled KONG (remember to use doggy/puppy friendly peanut butter). Freezing the toy will take them longer to work through and will give some relief to their sore teething gums and teeth.   7) Does my new puppy need a collar? You may want to purchase your dogs collar before they arrive home with you, however it’s advised to purchase the correct size collar for your puppy, which you may have to wait until they’re here to measure them properly. It is a legal requirement to have a tag with your details on incase your puppy gets lost or strays away, but it’s advised not to add your puppy’s name to the tag.   8) How will I get my new puppy home? Collecting your puppy to take them home is really exciting, but it’s best to be prepared. Make sure you have a suitable carrier/crate to store them in safely for the journey. It’s important your dog is restrained as it is the law to keep your puppy properly restrained whilst driving. In your carrier, you may want to pop in a blanket that smells like home and a scent blanket that smells like their mum and litter mates. It’s also good to pop in some puppy training pads incase of any car sickness or accidental toilet trips.   9) When to start training my new puppy? You can start with bonding and training your puppy almost straight away, get some high quality, puppy training treats (make sure to check the guidelines), and enjoy teaching them new tricks - you’ll be amazed at how quick they learn!   10) When do I start grooming my puppy? It’s recommend that even if your pup won’t require grooming at first, you should regularly brush them to get them used to being groomed and handled. Choose a simple, soft brush and/or comb for the first couple of months. There will be a time you will need to wash your puppy, make sure you’re not using human shampoo as this will upset your puppy's PH levels and may not be compatible with your puppy flea treatment. It’s best to invest in a puppy shampoo that you can use when and if you need to bathe your puppy. We have recently launched our own puppy grooming set in our Petplex collection called the 'Puppy Purifier' it has a shampoo and a cologne to help keep your puppy smelling fresh.

By Megan Willis

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The Complete Dog Crate Guide
09.01.23 January 09, 2023 FAQs Featured

The Complete Dog Crate Guide

Some of the questions we are most frequently asked are related to crate training new puppies; Do I need to crate train my puppy? What size dog crate do I need for my new puppy? Are dog crates cruel?... This guide is for those who have asked any one of those questions, or any other question related to crate training. Our guide will cover all the reasons to strongly consider crating your puppy; what size crate you might need depending on your puppy’s breed; and how to make the crate an inviting place for your puppy.   What To Use A Dog Crate For There are a number of benefits to crate training: Crates offer a safe, quiet place for nervous pups in their new environment. Crates help with toilet training. Crates help teach your pup their bedtime routine quickly and efficiently. Crates make a great bed and private space for adult dogs, mimicking the “den” like home their canine ancestors would have lived in. When you first your new puppy home, they will likely be nervous of everything. Whilst they probably came in to contact with all sorts of noises from birth, everything will seem new again when you bring them home. Crates, when used correctly, will offer your pup a calm safe space of their own. It should become their little den where they can go to relax, as well as when you need to contain them for a short time. The crate will also help get them into a routine, helping teach them when it’s time for bed. As your puppy grows into an adult dog, the crate will become their quiet spot – somewhere for them to enjoy some quiet time and a nap… and maybe a chew on their favourite dog toy! What NOT to use crates for: Punishment and long-term confinement. This may seem obvious, but crates should never be used as a form of punishment. Rather, they should be seen as a safe space that they can retreat to when they want to relax and get away from the rest of the household. Then if you do need to close your puppy inside for a short time, they will feel relaxed and probably just go to sleep! The last thing you want is for your pup to be nervous of the crate which could lead to destructive behaviour due to stress.        Different Kinds Of Crate Dog crates fall into three main categories; Metal crates, wooden crates and travel crates. Metal Crates   [product] The most popular type of crate as they are less expensive than wooden crates and can easily be folded flat for practical storage when not in use. Some may not like the look of the somewhat cage-like metal crates, but when teamed with a fabric cover and bedding set, they become a really cosy den for your dog. We have both traditional metal crates and our new sliding door crate which is perfect for saving space. Wooden Crates [product] For those looking for something more substantial, our wooden crates are perfect. They are great if you’re looking for a dual-purpose piece of furniture as they suit a range of interior décor styles and make lovely end tables.   Travel Crate  Travel safety is of utmost importance and restraining your dog when travelling in the car is now a legal requirement. A travel crate is a really practical option for most people as they sit simply in the boot and can fold flat when not in use. They are also needed for travel by sea and air – again, another reason to train your pup in a crate whilst young.   How To Find The Perfect Size Dog Crate Are you wondering what size dog crate to get? We always suggest choosing a big enough crate for your puppy to grow into as an adult dog. This means you won’t have the expense of upgrading to a larger size later on and your dog won’t have to part with the den that has been their favourite private place for as long as they can remember! When they are fully grown, they should have plenty of head room in the crate - about 3-4” of space, as well as be able to move and turn around freely. The worst thing would be for your dog to be cramped inside. Dog crates come in a number of different sizes, the most common being 24”, 30”, 36”, 42” and 48” in length. Different brands may vary slightly, but most will offer these most common size options. These are our size recommendations for each size of crate*: 24" Crate (S) Chihuahua, Jack Russell, Shih Tzu, Yorkshire Terrier and similar breeds 30" Crate (M) Westie, Beagle, Standard and Miniature Dachshunds, French Bulldog, Border Terrier and similar 36" Crate (L)  Cockapoo, Springer Spaniel, Bulldog and similar breeds 42" Crate (XL) Labrador, Dalmatian, Labradoodle, English Bull Terrier and similar breeds 48" Crate (XXL) Golden Retrievers, Greyhounds, Bernese Mountain Dogs and similar breeds *These are our general breed size recommendations. When selecting your crate speak to your breeder to find out what crate size they think will be most suitable. Not every dog of a particular breed is the same size. You might have or be expecting a particularly large Frenchie or a very dainty Cockapoo – use our recommendations as a guide and use this with your breeder’s knowledge of the litter for a more accurate size recommendation.   How To Make A Dog Crate More Comfortable Crates in their purest form are not the most enticing looking things. One of the first things you will want to do is make the dog crate look inviting. When your puppy is young, you’ll probably add a cosy puppy bed and a blanket as well as a cover to help make it feel more private and comfortable. As your pup grows up a full-size crate cushion is the ideal choice. Our own brand crate bedding has been designed to make your dog’s crate the most comfortable den ever. We make cushions, bumpers and covers in a whole variety of fabrics to suit every taste. Cushions – Our crate cushions are deeply filled with hollow fibre filling to ensure supreme comfort. The handmade covers are detachable and washable making them super practical. There is also a removable waterproof liner so accidents won’t permeate the inner cushion. Bumpers – Our bumpers have been designed to create a cosy wall of softness to the inside of your dog’s crate. Sitting around the edge of the cushion, they are perfect for dogs and puppies who like to snuggle up in the corner of their crate. They also look beautiful too! Covers – Our crate covers are practical and stylish. Our crate covers are handmade in our workshop and turn your bare, draughty crate into a beautiful pet den. They come in a range of fabric choices and feature roll-up doors to help get your pup in their bedtime routine.   How To Make The Perfect Puppy Crate The crate set-up will be slightly different for a puppy to the crate set-up for an adult dog. If you buy a size suitable for your pup as an adult as we recommend, we’d then suggest the following items to use inside: Puppy Bed Vet Bed Puppy pad Water bowls Crate Cover Blanket/Snuggle Toy Chew Toy Our preferred layout is to pop a piece of Vetbed on the base of the crate then a puppy bed on top in one half; then pop a puppy pad in the other half. Your puppy won’t be able to hold themselves in the first couple of weeks that they’re home so a puppy pad will ensure accidents are easily cleaned. Remember to add in a bowl for water for when your pup is closed inside and a chew toy to help prevent them from nibbling their bed! When your puppy grows and is fully toilet trained you can swap out the puppy essentials for a full crate set; a cushion, bumper and cover. Our crate sets offer optimum den comfort whilst looking super stylish too! Explore our crate bedding range.

By Megan Willis

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