Lords & Labradors Information Hub

The home of handy tips and advice dedicated to pet owners

How to Travel with Cats in a Car for a Long Distance
18.12.23 December 18, 2023 Owning a Cat Featured

How to Travel with Cats in a Car for a Long Distance

Traveling with feline companions can be a rewarding experience, yet ensuring their comfort during long-distance car journeys poses a significant challenge for pet owners. Whether embarking on a road trip or relocating cross country, proper preparation and the right equipment, notably a reliable cat car carrier or crate, are essential for a smooth and stress-free journey. Selecting the Ideal Cat Carrier for Car Travel Choosing the right cat carrier for car travel lays the foundation for a successful trip. Opt for a carrier that's spacious enough for your cat to stand, turn around, and lie down comfortably. Consider the following features: Size Matters: For extended journeys, a spacious carrier is crucial. Look for carriers specifically designed for car travel that offer ample room without being too bulky for your vehicle. Airflow: Ensure the carrier has proper ventilation to keep your cat comfortable. Clear View: Cats are often reassured by being able to see their surroundings. Look for carriers with transparent walls or ample windows. Safety Features: Opt for carriers with reliable locking systems to prevent any accidental openings during transit. You'll also want to make sure it's a durable carrier with a solid build to ensure the safety of your cat during the journey. Our Favourite Cat Carriers For Car Travel Catit Cabrio Cat Carrier - This is one of our most popular cat carriers and it’s easy to see why. It fastens into the car using the seatbelt making it perfect for car journeys, it also has a 360° accessible design plus removable bowls for food and water provide convenience and comfort. Trixie Easy Soft Travel Carrier - If you’re looking for more space for your cat then why not try the Trixie Easy Soft Travel Carrier, it comes in 3 sizes so you’ll be able to find the perfect size for your favourite feline. The base mat inside is made from the softest sherpa which is perfect for snuggling on, there’s also mesh sides for ventilation and there are easy carry handles making it perfect for travel Mobile Dog Gear Pet Carrier Plus - Although designed for dogs this pet carrier is also perfect for travelling with your cat, it fastens into the car with the seatbelt so is great for car trips. It also has a tether inside which is great if your cat wears a harness as it will keep them nice and secure. The bag has a handy shoulder strap so is easy to carry if you’ve got any walking to do on your journey. Preparing Your Cat for Car Travel Gradual Acclimatisation: Introduce the carrier to your cat gradually by placing treats or their favourite toys inside. Encourage them to explore and associate the carrier with positive experiences. Trial Runs: Before the long journey, take short drives to help your cat get accustomed to the motion and sounds of the car. Familiar Comforts: Line the carrier with your cat’s bedding and include items that carry familiar scents from home to provide comfort during the journey. Tips for Long-Distance Travel with Cats Plan Regular Breaks: Schedule breaks every few hours to allow your cat to stretch, use the litter tray, and have some water. Hydration and Feeding: Offer water at regular intervals to keep them hydrated. Offer a light meal a few hours before the journey to reduce the chances of motion sickness.  Safety Measures: Place the carrier on a stable surface within the car, preferably secured with a seat belt to prevent excessive movement during travel. Natural Calming Aids: Consider using pheromone sprays or natural calming aids to help keep your cat relaxed during the journey. We love the Beaphar cat calming range, it comes in spot-ons, plug-in diffusers and sprays so there’s lots of options to suit your cat. The calming medications promote feelings of reassurance and well-being using pheromone technology Traveling long distances with cats in a car requires thoughtful planning and consideration for your feline friend's comfort and safety. Investing in a suitable cat carrier designed for car travel, coupled with gradual acclimatisation and strategic preparations, can significantly alleviate stress for both you and your cat. With patience, preparation, and the right equipment, traveling with your beloved feline companion can be a rewarding and enjoyable experience for both of you.

By Megan Willis

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Our Guide To Taking Your Dog On The Train For The First Time
31.10.23 October 31, 2023 Owning a Dog Featured

Our Guide To Taking Your Dog On The Train For The First Time

For many dog owners, the thought of taking their furry companions on a train journey for the first time can be both exciting and nerve-wracking. Questions like "Are dogs allowed on trains?" and "Can you take dogs on the Eurostar?" often arise. Fortunately, with the right knowledge and preparation, traveling with your dog on a train can be a smooth and enjoyable experience. In this comprehensive guide, we will address all your concerns and provide valuable insights on how to make your dog's first train journey a pleasant one.   Are Dogs Allowed on Trains? Yes, dogs are generally allowed on trains, but specific regulations and policies can vary between train operators and regions. To ensure a smooth journey, it's crucial to research the dog-friendly policies of the train service you plan to use. Most train services allow dogs to travel with their owners, but there are conditions you should be aware of, such as size restrictions, the need for a lead and, in some cases, the requirement for a muzzle. Can Dogs Go On Trains In The UK? Traveling with your canine companion on trains in the United Kingdom is a common practice, and train operators across the country have established guidelines to make this experience safe and enjoyable for both pets and passengers. Here, we will provide you with information based on the guidance from the official National Rail website. National Rail has laid out a comprehensive pet policy to clarify the rules and requirements for traveling with dogs and other pets on trains across the UK. Below are some key points from their policy: Size Restrictions: National Rail's pet policy does not specify a weight limit for dogs, but it is essential to ensure your dog is well-behaved and can fit comfortably in the space provided without causing inconvenience to other passengers. Lead Requirements: While on the train, your dog should be kept on a lead or harness, or in some cases in a pet carrier - smaller dogs may feel more comfortable in a dog carrier.  Carriage Restrictions: Dogs are typically allowed in the passenger carriages, but it is advisable to check with your specific train service for designated areas or carriages for travellers with pets. Reservations: Making a reservation is strongly recommended when traveling with your dog, as it ensures you have sufficient space and reduces potential inconveniences to other passengers. Cleaning Up: Responsible pet owners should carry poop bags to clean up after their dogs. This ensures that the train remains clean and hygienic for all passengers. Identification and Vaccination Documents: While it is not a strict requirement on all train services, it's a good practice to carry identification and vaccination documents for your dog. This can be especially important if your dog were to become lost during your journey. Make sure the name and address on both their microchip and ID tag on their collar is up to date.  Behaviour and Consideration: Be considerate of your fellow passengers. Ensure your dog remains well-behaved, quiet, and does not cause any disturbances during the journey. It's important to note that National Rail's pet policy is a guideline for the entire UK rail network, but there may be some variations depending on the train operator or specific services. Therefore, it is advisable to check with the train service you plan to use to ensure you comply with their individual pet policy.   Can Dogs Go On Eurostar Trains? Dogs can only go on certain Eurostar train routes, but there are guidelines you must follow. Eurostar allows small dogs to travel with their owners under specific conditions. Make sure to check the Eurostar website for the most up-to-date information on their pet policy.   Taking Your Dog on the Train for the First Time Now that you know dogs are generally welcome on trains, let's explore some essential tips to ensure a stress-free and comfortable journey for both you and your canine companion. 1. Check the Train Service's Pet Policy Before embarking on your journey, visit the official website of the train service you plan to use. Familiarise yourself with their specific pet policy, including size restrictions, lead and muzzle requirements, and any additional charges. 2. Make a Reservation When traveling with your dog on a train, it's advisable to make a reservation. This helps ensure there is enough space for both you and your furry friend. Inform the train operator that you'll be traveling with a dog when booking your ticket. 3. Prepare Your Dog It's essential to prepare your dog for the train journey. Introduce your pet to the sights and sounds of the train station and use positive reinforcement to create a calm and stress-free atmosphere. Bring your dog's favourite toys and a comfortable blanket for added comfort. 4.Carry Essential Supplies Pack the following essentials for your dog's journey: Water and a portable bowl Dog food and treats Poop bags for clean-up Identification and vaccination documents First-aid kit 5. Choose the Right Seat Select a seat that's more spacious and comfortable for both you and your dog. Many train services have designated areas for passengers with pets, so inquire about these options when making your reservation. 6. Be Considerate of Other Passengers Remember that not everyone on the train may be as fond of dogs as you are. Keep your dog on a lead, and ensure they are well-behaved throughout the journey. Be respectful of other passengers by avoiding excessive barking or any disturbances. Traveling with your dog on a train for the first time can be a wonderful experience when approached with proper planning and knowledge. Dogs are generally allowed on trains, and the key to a successful journey lies in understanding and adhering to the specific pet policies of the train service you choose. Prepare your dog, carry essential supplies, and be considerate of other passengers to ensure a smooth and enjoyable trip for both you and your furry friend. With the right preparation, your dog can become the perfect travel companion on the rails.

By Megan Willis

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10 Dog Friendly National Trusts Near You
09.10.23 October 09, 2023 Owning a Dog Featured

10 Dog Friendly National Trusts Near You

For dog owners, there's nothing quite like exploring the great outdoors with your furry companion. Fortunately, the National Trust, renowned for preserving and protecting some of the UK's most stunning natural and historical sites, offers numerous dog-friendly options. In this blog post, we'll guide you through the best dog-friendly National Trust properties and sites near you, ensuring both you and your four-legged friend can enjoy a memorable day out.   The National Trust's Commitment to Dog-Friendly Policies The National Trust has a strong commitment to welcoming dogs and their owners. Many of their properties, gardens, and estates are dog-friendly, as long as canine code is followed. They teamed up with one of favourite food brands, Forthglade, to create the canine code; it has 4 key rules. Keep them close - use a short lead when walking your dog to keep them from disturbing ground-nesting birds and farm animal Pick up poo - make sure to have some poo bags to hand to clean up after your dog Watch the signs - make sure to read any signage to double check where you're walking is dog friendly, some areas are only dog friendly at certain times of year Stay on the ball - as much as we love our four-legged friends, they can be scary to some people. We advise making sure they don't run up to people so that everyone can enjoy their walks   10 Dog-Friendly National Trust Properties 1. Lyme Park, Cheshire Lyme Park is a dog-friendly National Trust property nestled in the heart of Cheshire. With over 1,400 acres of parkland and woodland to explore, your dog will have a field day here. The sweeping vistas and stunning mansion make this a great place for both human and canine history buffs. 2. Trelissick, Cornwall Trelissick, located near Truro in Cornwall, offers a beautiful garden and estate that welcomes dogs. Meander through the gardens and woodlands while taking in breathtaking views of the Fal River. Enjoy a short stroll across the parkland that overlooks the estuary and sea with views as far as your eye can see. Or, take a longer a trek down through the trees to Roundwood Quay. 3. Petworth House and Park, West Sussex In the picturesque county of West Sussex, you'll find Petworth House and Park. Dogs on leads are welcome in the parkland surrounding the grand house, making it a delightful destination for a dog walk, you may even spot some deer!  4. Goddards' Garden, Yorkshire If you're looking for a serene garden setting to explore with your dog, Goddards Garden in North Yorkshire is an excellent choice. The garden's tranquil atmosphere, charming pergolas, and colourful flowerbeds create a picturesque backdrop for your leisurely stroll with your furry friend. You can both enjoy the scent of blooming flowers and the calming sound of birdsong as you wander through this hidden gem. 5. Sissinghurst Castle Garden, Kent Sissinghurst Castle Garden in Kent is famous for its stunning design and vibrant flora. Dog owners will be pleased to know that dogs on leads are welcome in the garden, making it a fantastic place for a leisurely stroll. While the options listed above are excellent, there are many more dog-friendly National Trust properties across the UK. Some other noteworthy mentions include: Clumber Park, Nottinghamshire Stowe, Buckinghamshire Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal Water Garden, North Yorkshire Mount Stewart, County Down Stackpole, Pembrokeshire Finding Dog-Friendly National Trusts Near You To find dog-friendly National Trust properties near you, visit the official National Trust website and use their interactive map. You can filter your search to display only dog-friendly sites, making the planning process a breeze.   Forthglade x National Trust Dog Food The National Trust and Forthglade have co-branded range of gourmet dinners, the purchase of each recipe goes towards supporting the National Trust's amazing work in caring for many of the beautiful places we and our four-legged friends love to explore, including 780 miles of coastline, forests, woods, fens, beaches, historic houses, gardens, pubs & more! We stock some of the range here at L&L and our office dogs can confirm how much they love the range! The National Trust offers a wealth of dog-friendly options for both local and visiting dog owners. With their commitment to preserving natural beauty and historical significance, you can explore the UK's cultural heritage with your canine companion by your side. Remember to check specific property guidelines and respect the rules to ensure a pleasant experience for all visitors. So, whether you're seeking historic houses, picturesque gardens, or vast landscapes, there's a dog-friendly National Trust site near you waiting to be discovered. Enjoy your adventures with your furry friend!

By Megan Willis

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Why You Should Keep Toxic Blue-Green Algae Away From Your Dog
11.09.23 September 11, 2023 Health Featured

Why You Should Keep Toxic Blue-Green Algae Away From Your Dog

Blue-green algae, also known as cyanobacteria, can be a beautiful natural sight in many bodies of water. However, beneath their picturesque appearance lies a hidden danger, especially to our furry companions. In this blog post, we'll delve into the reasons why you should be vigilant about keeping toxic blue-green algae away from your dog whilst you're out on walks. We'll also discuss the symptoms of blue-green algae poisoning in dogs, treatment options, and how to recognise the signs of potential toxicity. Let's prioritise our pets' well-being and keep them safe from this silent threat.   Understanding Toxic Blue-Green Algae Blue-green algae, despite its name, is not actually algae but a type of bacteria that thrives in freshwater and brackish water bodies. These organisms can form dense blooms on the surface of ponds, lakes, and rivers, particularly during warm, stagnant conditions. While not all blue-green algae are harmful, certain species produce toxins that can be lethal to both wildlife and pets, including dogs.   Symptoms of Algae Poisoning in Dogs Blue-green algae poisoning can be life-threatening for dogs, and it's crucial to recognise the symptoms early. Common signs of blue-green algae poisoning in dogs include: Vomiting: Dogs may vomit shortly after ingesting contaminated water or algae. Diarrhoea: Diarrhoea can occur, often accompanied by blood or mucus. Lethargy: Your dog may appear weak, tired, and less active than usual. Excessive Salivation: Increased drooling may be noticeable. Difficulty Breathing: Breathing difficulties and panting can be signs of severe poisoning. Seizures: In severe cases, seizures can occur, indicating a critical stage of toxicity. Liver Failure: Advanced poisoning may lead to liver damage, which can manifest as jaundice (yellowing of the eyes and gums). Neurological Symptoms: Some dogs may exhibit confusion, disorientation, or other neurological symptoms.   Treatment of Blue-Green Algae Poisoning If you suspect your dog has ingested or come into contact with toxic blue-green algae, it's essential to act quickly: Seek Immediate Veterinary Care: Contact your vet or an emergency out-of-hours vet immediately. Rinse Your Dog: If possible, rinse your dog thoroughly with clean water to remove any residue from the algae. Do Not Induce Vomiting: Do not attempt to induce vomiting without consulting a vet, as this can worsen the situation in some cases. Keep Your Dog Calm: Minimise your dog's activity to prevent the toxins from spreading more rapidly. Monitor Vital Signs: Keep an eye on your dog's breathing, heart rate, and temperature.   Preventing Blue-Green Algae Poisoning Prevention is the best strategy to protect your dog from blue-green algae poisoning. Here are some tips to keep your furry friend safe: Stay Informed: Be aware of blue-green algae blooms in your area by checking with local authorities or using online resources. Keep Your Dog On Their Lead: When walking near bodies of water, keep your dog on a lead to prevent them from drinking contaminated water or exploring algae-covered areas. Avoid Swimming in Suspicious Waters: If there are signs of algae blooms, do not allow your dog to swim or play in those waters. Provide Clean Water: Always bring fresh, clean water for your dog when you're out and about.  Learn to Recognise Blue-Green Algae: Familiarise yourself with what blue-green algae looks like to avoid contaminated areas.   Where is Blue-Green Algae Found In The UK? Blue-green algae can commonly be found in various water bodies across the United Kingdom. They tend to thrive in freshwater environments such as ponds, lakes, reservoirs, and slow-moving rivers, especially during warm summer months. These algae often form dense blooms on the water's surface, giving it a greenish or bluish tint. Coastal areas and estuaries can also be susceptible to blue-green algae, particularly in areas where the water becomes brackish due to the mixing of freshwater and seawater. While not all blue-green algae are toxic, it's essential for residents and visitors to be aware of local water quality advisories and exercise caution when using or allowing pets to access these water bodies to prevent potential exposure to harmful cyanobacterial toxins. Conclusion Toxic blue-green algae poses a severe threat to our canine companions, and it's crucial to take precautions to keep them safe. Knowing the symptoms of algae poisoning in dogs, seeking immediate veterinary care, and practicing prevention are key steps in safeguarding your pet's health. Be vigilant, stay informed, and prioritise your dog's well-being to ensure they stay healthy and happy.

By Megan Willis

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How To Travel With Your Dog
17.08.23 August 17, 2023 Owning a Dog Featured

How To Travel With Your Dog

Traveling with your canine companion can be an exciting adventure, but it requires careful planning and the right accessories to ensure a comfortable and stress-free journey for both you and your furry friend. From car travel accessories to travel beds and walking gear, we've compiled a comprehensive guide to help you pack the essential items for a successful trip with your dog.   Car Travel Safety should always be a top priority when traveling with your dog in a car. It's a legal requirement to secure your dog whilst driving and there are a few ways you can do this. Dog Seatbelts & Tethers A dog seat belt or tether that attaches either to the ISO fix point in your car or clips into your seatbelt will help keep your furry friend secure and prevent them from moving around the vehicle, reducing the risk of accidents and injuries.Our favourite is the KONG ultimate safety tether, it's great for both small and large dogs whilst travelling and has been designed with your dog's safety in mind   Dog Booster Seats [product] For smaller dogs or cars with a small boot space, you may want your dog to sit in the main space of the car with you. A booster seat is an ideal choice for small breed dogs and puppies as it allows them to sit high up to see where they are going whilst keeping them secure with a harness attachment, we particularly like the Trixie car seat for dogs!   Travel Crates Travel crates are a great option if you want to keep the main space of your car free for passengers, they fit in the boot of your car and keep your dog secure whilst traveling.  For longer trips, they are a perfect safe space for your dog to rest comfortably during the journey. Make sure it's large enough for your dog to stand, turn around, and lie down.     Travel Beds  Here at L&L we have a few options which are perfect for travel. Travel Mats Our range of travel mats are the perfect travel companion, they come in our three most popular sizes and have a handy travel handle so you can take them with you anywhere! They roll up and fasten making them super easy to take out and about on your travels. They are perfect for popping in the boot of your car and to take along on your travels.      Sleepeze The Sleepeze Dog Cushion is the ultimate sleep sanctuary for your pup! Super plump and cosy with extra deep hollow fibre filling, this handmade cushion comes in fun prints, with a handle for convenient portability. The perfect blend of comfort and style, the Sleepeze is great for a travel crate, as a stand-alone bed, and in the boot of your car!     Essentials Herdwick & Twill Beds Many of our Essentials Herdwick & Twill beds have been designed with an Italian leather handle making them perfect for travel. They are designed using the most beautiful plush fabrics and fleece, perfect for home and away!     Travel Bags Dogs come with a lot of stuff, especially if you're staying overnight somewhere. Investing in a dog-specific travel bag can be a game-change for keeping all their stuff in one place. The Mobile Dog Gear bags are amazing, they have space for all you'll need for a weekend or a week away. These bags are designed to carry all your dog's essentials, such as food, treats, medication, waste bags, and even your dog's favourite toys. They even come with handy food storage containers and pop-up travel bowls - perfect for your staycations this summer.     [product] If you're out for a day the Cocopup walking bags are the perfect size for all your and your dog's essentials, they have a handy treat pouch and come in a range of colours so you're sure to find one to match your outfit!   Dog Walking When out and about your dog you'll need either a collar or a harness with an ID tag on, the choice for this comes down to personal preference and the suitability for your dog. Collars come in a whole array of materials and sizes to suit pretty much all breeds and ages of dog. If you have a small breed dog or a puppy, perhaps a buttery soft rolled leather collar and lead will be preferable; a stylish set that will fit their small frames comfortably. If you have a larger dog, perhaps the Dogs & Horses Colours collection will be more suitable.   For more stability and comfort, a harness can be a good alternative to a collar. Particularly good for breeds such as French Bulldogs who have shorter necks, they offer extra comfort and a good level of control when out walking. Also great for the adventuring dog, offering the support needed for hiking and scrambling!  Harnesses are also a must have for the car, they're great for clipping your dog's seatbelt tether or booster seat on to. If you're going on long walks you may want to get an extendable dog lead like the Flexi comfort leads, these are great for giving your dog the freedom to explore whilst making sure they don't stray too far.    Messy Pups If you're on a muddy walk or go for a paddle in the sea you'll want to get your dog as clean and dry as possible before they get back in the car or into your home. Don't worry we've got you covered! Drying coats are a great fuss-free way to dry your furry friend's luscious locks off! Our Lords & Labradors drying collection comes in four colours (Fir, Mole, Navy and Gun Metal) and is made from super soft and snuggly bamboo fleecy fabric. The collection has our drying coats, mitts and cushion covers - perfect to help dry them off after a splash at the beach or muddy puddle jumping!   Dexas Mudbusters are perfect for any mucky encounters, they're an innovative way to help clean your dog's paws! Muddy paws go in and clean paws come out, super handy after trips to the park, walks, or hikes. Keeping a pack of pet wipes to hand is always helpful, any accidents or muck can quickly be wiped away. We particularly love the Earth-Rated wipes which you can either get unscented or lavender-scented! For once you're back home and are looking to bathe your pup after a day of mucky fun we love the PetPlex grooming collection. Formulated to salon quality standards, this grooming range really is the best of the best. Available in 4 wonderful ranges, Puppy purifier, Dirt Defeater, Curl Perfector and Derma Doctor, whatever your dog's coat type and skin requirements we're sure to have the grooming solution for them.   Travel Accessories Travel bowls are a must! We particularly like the Beco versions which are collapsible and come in various sizes.  Charlie The Vet First Aid Kit is a must have on our packing list, it is packed full with over 40 items you may need whilst you're away. Charlie the vet created it with her may years of veterinary experience in mind, filling it with everything pet owners need on the go.    Traveling with your dog can be a rewarding experience with the right preparation and accessories. From ensuring your dog's safety in the car to providing them with a comfortable place to sleep and eat, these essential items will contribute to a seamless journey for both you and your four-legged friend. Remember to also pack any necessary medications, vaccination records, and identification tags to ensure a worry-free adventure. By planning ahead and catering to your dog's needs, you'll be well-equipped to enjoy the sights and sounds of the world together. Happy travels!

By Megan Willis

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A Guide to Taking a Dog to Europe: Unleash the Fun-Filled Holidays with Your Furry Friend!
15.08.23 August 15, 2023 Owning a Dog Featured

A Guide to Taking a Dog to Europe: Unleash the Fun-Filled Holidays with Your Furry Friend!

If you're a dog owner, you know how challenging it can be to leave your furry companion behind when planning a trip to Europe. The good news is that taking your dog to Europe for a holiday is not only possible but can also be an incredibly rewarding experience! From exploring the picturesque streets of France to strolling along the scenic Italian coasts, travelling with your pup can create lasting memories together. In this guide, we'll provide you with valuable tips and insights to ensure a smooth and enjoyable journey for both you and your four-legged friend.   1. Preparing for the Journey: Before embarking on your adventure, make sure your dog is well-prepared for the trip. When travelling to an EU country there are a few things your pet will need: A microchip A valid rabies vaccination An animal health certificate or a valid pet passport Tapeworm treatments for dogs if you’re going to Finland, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Norway or Malta  You will also want to check the rules of the country you’re travelling to in case they have any other requirements or rules before you travel   Getting A Pet Passport Rules about pet passports vary depending on the country you are going to, not all countries accept pet passports issued in Great Britain. If the country you are planning on going to doesn’t accept a pet passport, you will need an animal health certificate. You may also need some other supporting documents, we recommend checking the government website for more detailed and up-to-date guidance.   Packing For A Pet Friendly Holiday You will want to take plenty of home comforts away with you to make your dog’s trip away as easy as possible. We’ve put below a few of our essentials for travelling with your dog Mobile dog gear travel bag Collar with up to date ID tag A travel mat or bed A travel crate if you are flying A car crate or booster seat if you’re travelling by car Fun interactive toys to keep them busy Calming spot or spray on if you have a nervous dog A pet first aid kit Your dog’s food Drying coat or mitts - perfect if you are holidaying by the beach Travel bowls or water bottle - great for feeding on the go   2. Navigating Air Travel with Your Dog: Flying to Europe with your dog requires careful planning. Here are a few of our top tips [product] Research pet-friendly airlines that allow dogs in the cabin or have comfortable accommodations in the cargo hold. Book your flights well in advance, and don't forget to check the airline's policies and fees for traveling with pets. Make sure to invest in a well-ventilated, airline-approved pet carrier to keep your dog safe and comfortable throughout the journey - we recommend the Trixie Friends On Tour Transport Boxes  For more information on travelling internationally with your dog, our Pet Experts have put together a guide with their top tips and tricks in for flying with your dog.   3. Exploring Dog-Friendly Destinations in Europe: Europe offers a plethora of dog-friendly holiday destinations, and one of the top picks is undoubtedly France. Known for its rich culture, breathtaking landscapes, and delicious cuisine, France welcomes furry travellers with open arms. Many cities in France, such as Paris, Nice, and Bordeaux, are pet-friendly, boasting dog-friendly parks, cafés, and attractions.   4. Accommodation Options for You and Your Dog: When planning your stay in Europe, opt for dog-friendly accommodations. Many hotels, guesthouses, and vacation rentals in France are happy to welcome canine guests. Before booking, inquire about their pet policies, additional charges, and available amenities for your pup. Or if you are going in a motorhome or with a caravan/tent, there are plenty of dog-friendly campsites who will welcome your four-legged companion with open arms.   5. Dog-Friendly Activities in Europe: Europe offers a myriad of dog-friendly activities to indulge in with your canine companion. Take leisurely walks along the stunning French Riviera, explore the dog-friendly beaches in Normandy, or hike the scenic trails in the French Alps. Don't forget to include your dog in your sightseeing plans, as many attractions and outdoor spaces allow well-behaved dogs on a lead.   6. Pet-Friendly Transportation within Europe: Getting around Europe with your dog can be hassle-free. Most European countries have pet-friendly public transportation systems, including trains and buses, which allow dogs on board. However, it's always a good idea to check specific regulations and requirements for each country you plan to visit. If you’re taking your car with your or hiring a car whilst you are abroad, most European countries require your pets to be properly secured in either a dog car seat, with a tether or in the boot in a car crate. If you’re going on long road trips with your dog it’s a good idea to plan in stops for them along the way, not all service stations are dog friendly so it’s good to plan your stops in.   7. Health and Safety Tips: [product] To ensure your dog's health and safety during your trip we recommend carrying essentials such as a first aid kit, medications, and sufficient food and water, as well as travel bowls so you can feed them on the go. We also recommend keeping your dog on a lead when required, and always clean up after them to respect the local environment and community.   Taking your dog to Europe can turn an ordinary vacation into an extraordinary adventure filled with shared experiences and cherished memories. With proper preparation and research, you can embark on a journey of a lifetime with your beloved pet. From the dog-friendly streets of Paris to the picturesque landscapes of Provence, Europe offers a tail-wagging experience like no other. So, pack your bags, buckle up your pup, and embark on this unforgettable journey together! Happy travels!

By Megan Willis

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The UK’s best locations for a dog friendly getaway, revealed!
21.06.23 June 21, 2023 Owning a Dog Featured

The UK’s best locations for a dog friendly getaway, revealed!

Summer holiday season is fast approaching, and according to a recent study, 72% of Brits still prefer staycations in 2023, despite international travel having opened up again post-pandemic. And when it comes to holidaying as a pet parent, staycations can be the paw-fect way to enjoy some much-needed R&R without having to leave your beloved dog behind. Luckily, the UK has plenty of gorgeous locations on offer, ideal for hosting a well-deserved break for you and your dog. Naturally, for those holidaying on home soil with a pooch, ensuring your destination of choice has plenty to keep both you and your pup happy and entertained is key. Nobody likes a ‘ruff deal’! With this in mind, we quizzed 2,000 UK dog owners about their thoughts on booking a holiday abroad if it meant leaving their four-legged friend behind, as well as asking them to share their top staycation choices and must haves for when they’re booking a dog friendly getaway. Using our findings, we then compared key data points relating to holidaying with a dog for the top 45 locations (that had come from the survey) and awarded a number of points for each in order to inform our list of the UK’s best locations for a dog friendly getaway. Read on to learn more...   That Guilty Feeling According to our findings, one in eight (13%) UK dog owners say they never holiday abroad because they feel guilty leaving their four-legged friend behind, instead opting for staycations here at home. And one in nine (11%) told us they actually choose to take their pet abroad with them when they go! For almost half, whilst they admit it bothers them to leave their pooch behind, leaving them with family and friends gives them peace of mind to enjoy a holiday outside of the UK from time to time. Interestingly, almost ten percent of dog owners we surveyed (8%) told us they never opt take a staycation with their dog. Regionally, it was Birmingham residents discovered to be feeling the guiltiest when it comes to leaving their doggo behind when jetting off on their jollies, as more than a quarter of residents (28%) say they never holiday away from UK soil as they simply cannot leave their pet behind. In stark contrast, just seven percent of Leeds residents would do agree. Women were found to be the most likely to forgo an international getaway due to the guilt they felt about leaving their dog behind, with one in six saying they never holiday abroad for this reason (16%), compared to just one in nine men (11%). A fifth of male dog owner (21%) even stated that leaving their pet behind whilst they get in some air miles does not bother them at all and they can do so guilt free.   The Price of True Love: Just How Much are UK Dog Owners Willing to Pay for a Dog Friendly Staycation? When we quizzed our panel of dog lovers about how much they’d be willing to spend to bring their four-legged friend away with them on a UK staycation, we learned that UK dog owners are willing to fork out an extra £50 per night on average to take their furry friend along with them on their UK staycation. On this basis, with 11 million dogs living in the UK alone in 2023, if each pooch enjoyed a single night away each year, it would mean an additional £550million for the UK travel industry According to our findings, Londoners are the biggest spenders on this front with residents in the capital sharing that they’d be willing to pay £65.41 per night on average in order to treat their pet to join them in some R&R. The average additional cost per night dog owners in the city would splash out for their dog to join them on their UK staycation   UK City  Avg. £ (GBP) per night London  £65.21  Newcastle  £60.00  Belfast  £56.30  Manchester  £55.17  Liverpool  £51.53  Bristol  £51.09  Birmingham  £45.53  Southampton  £37.33  Leeds  £37.15  Nottingham  £36.36  Cardiff  £35.09  Glasgow  £33.17  Norwich  £31.60  Sheffield  £28.68  Edinburgh  £18.50    Meanwhile, Edinburgh dog owners would pay the least (£18.50 per night on average), splashing out a substantial £46.91 less per night than those in the UK’s capital. Those aged between 25 and 34 were revealed to be the most generous when it came to their dogs, saying they’d be willing to splash out a whopping £73.17 on average per night so their pet could come along on their UK getaway. In comparison, those over 65 say they’d spend they least (£19.29).   How Much are UK Dog Owners Willing to Pay for a Dog Friendly Staycation Next, we asked the survey panel to share their favourite dog-friendly holiday locations, with Newquay in Cornwall claiming top spot amongst UK dog owners. Other popular locations included Whitby, York, Windermere, and London. Whilst at the bottom of the list, Douglas on the Isle of Man was found to be the least in favour with UK dog owners. Alongside Douglas, Derby, Reading, Southwold, and Nottingham all found themselves amongst the least favoured within the rankings.   What do Brits Want the Most from a Dog Friendly Staycation? We also asked our 2,000 dog owners to share their top considerations when booking a dog friendly staycation, with plenty of places to walk their pup coming out at the top of the list (42%). Other staycation “musts” included having dog friendly pubs in the local area (36%), plenty of dog friendly accommodation to pick from (35%), and of course, a good range of dog friendly restaurants and cafes (35%).   UK Dog Owners Top Considerations When Booking a Dog-Friendly Staycation Places to go walking - 42% Dog friendly pubs - 36% Dog friendly accommodation -35% Dog friendly restaurants/cafes - 26% A dog friendly garden in your accommodation -15% A vets close by - 13% Dog friendly beaches nearby - 12% Dog friendly shops (non-dog/pet shops) - 12% Dog friendly transport - 10% Relaxing Surroundings – 7%   The UK’s Best Locations for a Dog Friendly Getaway, Revealed Finally, we compiled and compared key data points relating to holidaying with a dog in 45 UK locations, all of which were informed by our pet owner survey.Points were then awarded based on the highest number of local walking routes, dog friendly pubs, hotels and other accommodation, vets in the area, pet shops, and of course the average weather. So, who came out as top dog? We reveal all... 1. Bath, Somerset Overall, Bath was crowned the UK's top location for a dog friendly getaway in our rankings, scoring 72 points out of a possible 100. Despite missing out on a place in the top 20 locations for a dog friendly holiday in our initial survey findings, the city secured the number one spot in our rankings thanks to its 56 dog friendly pubs within a 10-mile radius (0.56 per 1,000 residents), 20 B&Bs and hotels in the area, and an average of 18.8 dry days per month between June and September. Bath also scored highly for dog friendly aspects such as having 12 RCVS vets in the local area (0.13 per 1,000 residents), and 40 dog friendly pubs within a 10-mile radius (0.43 per 1,000 residents).   2. Lincoln Although it was found to be the top choice for a dog-friendly staycation by UK dog owners according to our survey, Newquay in Cornwall placed at number nine in the rankings. Lincoln scored just half a point behind leading city, Bath with 71.5/100, and those visiting the cathedral city in search of a dog-friendly getaway can take advantage of its 121 local walking routes (1.10 per 1,000 residents), 103 dog-friendly cottages and self-catering options, as well as an average temperature across June to August of 21 degrees Celsius. Additionally, Lincoln boasts 18.6 dry days per month on average across June to August, and 22 dog-friendly restaurants (0.22 per 1,000 residents).   3. Whitby, North Yorkshire The North Yorkshire seaside town of Whitby is up next, placing at number three on our list of the UK’s top holiday locations for a dog-friendly staycation (71/100). Tourists considering a trip to the beautiful seaside town of Whitby in the coming months with their pup in tow can enjoy 100 local walking routes (7.94 per 1,000 residents), 52 dog friendly pubs within a 10-mile radius (1 per 1,000 residents), 35 pet shops (0.67 per 1,000 residents), and an average temperature across June to August of 20.3 degrees Celsius – not forgetting fish, chips and plenty of ice cream too!   4. Bakewell, Peak District In fourth place is the pretty Peak District town of Bakewell, which scored 70.5 points out of a possible 100. Dogs and their owners visiting the beautiful market town for a dog friendly staycation this summer will be greeted by a very generous 325 local walking routes (92.88 per 1,000 residents), 45 dog-friendly pubs (12.86 per 1,000 residents), and 20 RCVS vets in the local area (5.72 per 1,000 residents), and five pet shops within a 10-mile radius of the town (1.43 per 1,000 residents).   5. Southwold, Suffolk Number five is on the list is another pretty seaside town, Southwold, which is located a little further down the UK coastline in Suffolk. Scoring 70 out of a possible 100, alongside easy access to the beach, visitors to the coastal Suffolk town of Southwold will find eight dog friendly restaurants (8.42 per 1,000 residents), four pet shops (4.21 per 1,000 residents), an average of 18.6 dry days per month between June and September, as well as an average daytime temperature of 21 degrees Celsius across the same three-month period.   The Full List of Rankings Rank  Location   Score (out of 100)  1  Bath, Somerset   72 2  Lincoln   71.5 3  Whitby, North Yorkshire   71 4  Bakewell, Peak District   70.5 5  Southwold, Suffolk   70 6  Oxford   69.5 7  Skegness, Lincolnshire   69 8  Keswick, Cumbria   67 9  Newquay, Cornwall   66.5 10  Sandown, Isle of Wight   66  11  Helmsley, North Yorkshire Moors 64.5 12  Stratford Upon Avon, Warwickshire   64  13  Salisbury, Wiltshire   62.5 14  Torquay, Devon    62  15  Cheltenham, Gloucestershire   61.5 16  Derby   61  17  Windermere, Cumbria   58  18  Eastbourne, Sussex   55  19  Bamburgh, Northumbria    54.5 20 Inverness, Highlands  54 21 Norwich, Norfolk    54 21 Norwich, Norfolk  53.5 22 Ilkley, Yorkshire Dales 53 23 York 52.5 24 Melrose, Scottish Borders 52 25 Great Yarmouth, The Norfolk Broads 50.1 26 Brighton 50 27 Dover, Kent  48 28 Bristol 45 29 Blackpool 44.5 30 Douglas, Isle of Man  44 31 London  43.5 32 Nottingham 43 33 Reading, Berkshire 41 34 Bournemouth, Dorset 41.5 35 Plymouth, Devon 41 36 Edinburgh 40 37 Swansea, Wales 39 38 Cardiff, Wales 38 39 Southend on Sea, Essex 36 40 Newcastle Upon Tyne 33.5 41 Lancaster 33 42 Birmingham 26.5 43 Liverpool 26 44 Glasgow 20 45 Belfast 14   The Lowest Scoring UK Escapes At the very bottom of the dog-friendly holiday rankings was Belfast securing an overall score of just 14 out of 405. Sadly, despite being a popular tourist destination, the Northern Irish city received a low score and placed last on our list of rankings due to having just 14 dog friendly pubs within 10 miles of the city (0.02 per 1,000 residents), six dog friendly hotels and B&Bs, two dog friendly self-catering options, and an average of 13.4 dry days per month between June and August. Other locations that placed at the bottom end of the list, included Glasgow (20/100), Liverpool (26/100), Birmingham (26.5/100) and Lancaster (33/100).   Top Tips for Holidaying with Your Dog With our findings in mind, we thought we would share some of our top tips for holidaying with a dog....   Traveling to and Around your Destination with a Dog Whether you opt to reach your staycation venue by train, car, or bus, traveling with a dog can take a bit of careful pre-preparation and planning. For example, if your dog is not used to traveling by vehicle, it’s advisable to get in some practise runs locally, before you head off on a longer journey. This will give your pet plenty of time to get used to the new smells, sounds and general surroundings, as well as familiarising them with the unusual sensation of being inside a moving vehicle. If you’re traveling to your destination by car specifically, then it’s worth noting that in the UK (and in many other countries) it is a legal requirement to secure your dog whilst driving, this is for your own safety as well as theirs. The Highway Code states in their Rules about Animals, that when in a vehicle, dogs must be suitably restrained so they cannot distract drivers or injure you, or themselves. If you find they have managed to get loose in the vehicle, then you must find a safe place to pull over and stop the car quickly. As such, there are a number of ways in which you can ensure your dog is safely secured and still comfortable, especially if you have a lengthy drive ahead of you. If you have the space, then for smaller dogs especially, it’s often preferable to have them inside the main car space alongside the rest of the family. In this instance, you may find a doggy booster seat to be the best solution for your pet as it allows them to ride safely up front, giving them the opportunity to see what’s going on outside of the car, whilst still being secured via a harness attachment. This option is better suited to smaller breeds. For larger breeds, you could opt for a tether. This clever attachment fixes to ISO fix point or to your seatbelt and means you can safely attach it to your pet's travel harness, meaning they cannot wander around your vehicle freely whilst in motion. Alternatively, you may decide that a travel crate or carrier in the boot of the vehicle is a more suitable option as it gives you back that valuable space in the main body of your car. If you do choose this method of securing your pet, you can make sure they feel safe and comfortable by adding in their favourite bed or pet blanket to help make the crate a little more comfortable for their journey. Finally, make sure you plan in plenty of stops along the way. This will allow your pet to stretch their legs, have a drink of water or a small snack, as well as getting in those much-needed toilet breaks, and give you chance to praise and reassure them.   What to Pack? Much like with humans, dogs tend to come with a rather large number of travel essentials. When packing for a holiday with your pooch, we’d recommend considering the following items, even for a shorter getaway: • Bedding and blankets• A few of their favourite toys• Food and snacks• Doggy bowls• Plenty of poo bags• Any medication they might be on• A doggy first aid kit• Harnesses, collars, and leads• Any wet weather gear they may need (onesies, coats, etc.)• Spare towels you don’t mind the dog using• Doggy shampoo + pet wipes• Details of local vets – just in case!• A rucksack or bag to pop the essentials in for when you’re out and about.   Conclusion It’s great to see so many dog owners enjoying all the UK has to offer, there really is an abundance of choice when it comes to getting out and about and exploring the beautiful country we live in. We hope our study has highlighted some of the beautiful destinations on home soil that are there to explore. And dog or no dog, we truly believe there is something for everyone just a stone's throw away from home. Whether you prefer a city break, a countryside jaunt with a good dog friendly pub at the end, or even a coastal break, wherever your travels take you to this summer, we hope you and your pet enjoy your adventures! Our Study Sources and Methodology Survey of 2,000 UK dog owners conducted in June 2023 Population Data - https://worldpopulationreview.com/ and https://www.citypopulation.de/en/uk  of local 'Walking Routes' per 1,000 residents - https://www.plotaroute.com/routes/walking  of 'Dog Friendly Pubs' per 1,000 residents - https://www.dogfriendly.co.uk/ and https://www.useyourlocal.com/  of 'Dog-Friendly Hotels & B&Bs' - https://www.dogfriendly.co.uk/hotels-b-and-b  of 'Dog-Friendly Cottages & Self Catering' - https://www.dogfriendly.co.uk/cottages-and-self-catering  of 'Dog Friendly Restaurants' Listed on TripAdvisor, per 1,000 residents - https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ - limited searches to specific places and not surrounding areas  of RCVS Vets in Local Area per 1,000 residents - https://findavet.rcvs.org.uk/home/  of 'Pet Shops' (within 10 miles of location) per 1,000 residents - https://www.yell.com/ and For Douglas: Google Listings  Dry Days June - Aug - https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather Temp Days June - Aug - https://www.meteoblue.com/en/weather 

By Megan Willis

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Walking Your Dog Safely In Spring
27.03.23 March 27, 2023 Health Featured

Walking Your Dog Safely In Spring

Longer daylight hours, blooming plants, an abundance of life beginning to come out of hibernation; Spring is a wonderful time of year. There are positives to be found in every season, but there is something special about Spring that manages to lift the spirits like no other. Longer days, milder weather and a wash of colour on the landscape will be welcomed by us all. For dog owners it’s the ideal time to make your dog walks a little longer. Perhaps you’ll find some new routes to explore that will add interest for both you and your four-legged friend. There are a few things to consider when walking your dog in the Springtime. Here we highlight we highlight some of those things so you can plan some new adventures.   Where To Walk Your Dog In Spring The places that you walk to or around in the Spring may not differ greatly to those in Winter, but what you do on your walk may well change. Here are a couple of places we like to enjoy on our Springtime dog walks: The Park - Parks are always a brilliant place to take your dog for their daily exercise. Especially parks with open space where they can run and let off some steam. With the milder weather, and hopefully the odd sunny spell, your dog walks in the park could include a game of fetch. Next time you go on your walk, take your dog’s favourite ball or throwing toy and see if you can fit in a fun game to add spice to the outing. The Woods - Dogs love woodland walks. There are a plethora or sights, sounds and smells in the woods that your dog probably won’t experience on a normal day. If you have some woodland near or can get to a wooded area easily, then Spring is the perfect time to get out and explore. The Beach - Another landscape that is loved by our canine friends, the beach offers a place to run, and if your dog likes water, to have a good swim. One thing to be aware of is that many beaches will be closed to dogs in the Summer months, so be aware of the beach that you’re visiting and make sure that you’re allowed to visit. There are many dog friendly beaches around the country; the trick is to find the perfect one! Remember to take your dog’s drying coat with you in case they go for a splash and don’t forget a couple of toys. Like any other dog walk, be aware of other people and only let your dog off the lead if it’s safe to do so. The Countryside - If you live in a rural location then a walk through the countryside can be a joyous adventure for both you and your dog. The landscape around us is full of change at this time of year and your dog will love experiencing the new smells and colours that emerge. Just make sure you stick to the rules of the countryside - stick to public footpaths and always keep your dog on their lead around livestock. Wherever your adventures take you, always be aware of other people around. If it’s busy keep your dog on their lead and consider saving any games of fetch until next time.   Potential Springtime Hazards There are a few things to consider when setting out for your Springtime dog walks. Here are a couple to be particularly aware of: Joggers & Cyclists - Dog walkers like yourselves won’t be the only people making the most of the extended daylight hours, but you’ll probably encounter cyclists, joggers and horse riders more often too. If you see any of these coming, keep your dog on a shortened lead next to you and wait for them to pass safely. The last thing you want is for your dog to chase a cyclist or rider as it could be dangerous for both parties. Livestock - We did mention this briefly before, but it’s really important that you take note of the animals around you. In Springtime especially, there will be lots of young animals around. Cows with calves can be particularly defensive of their young so it might be best to stick to routes without. Always assess the situation and keep your dog on a lead around farm animals and horses.   Beware of Poisonous Springtime Plants One of our favourite things about this season is the abundance of wildlife that appears, but this can also be a potential danger to your pets too. Make sure you are aware of what plants and flowers are poisonous to pets and try to keep your dog away from them on your walks. Some plants to avoid are as follows: • Azalea • Bluebells • Buttercups • Cyclamen (roots) • Daffodils (bulbs) • Foxgloves • Hyacinths (bulbs) • Ivy • Lupins • Rhododendrons • Tulips If your dog shows signs of being ill and you think they may have ingested something poisonous, seek the advice of your Vet immediately. If you see them eat something you know is poisonous, don’t wait for symptoms to appear, but seek medical advice straight away.   Don’t go too far, too quickly It might be tempting to make your Springtime dog walks much longer than usual, but It’s important to consider your dog’s fitness. If your dog walks were pretty short during Winter your dog may not be as fit or have the same stamina as they had last Summer. Increase the length of your dog walks gradually so that they can enjoy the experience without getting completely worn out.   Make Sure You Have the Right Equipment and Clothing  It’s easy to focus on what your dog needs for their walks, but don’t forget to consider your own comfort. If you’re going for a walk in the Countryside or the woods, make sure you select the correct footwear and clothing. A good sturdy pair of shoes or trainers (or walking boots in some cases) are essential for uneven terrains. Also make sure your dog’s walking set is a good fit. A well-fitted harness is a brilliant item for dog walks as it offers greater comfort and control than just using a collar.   Plan Your Dog Walks Wherever your adventures take you, make sure you plan ahead and take everything that you’ll need with you. And we don’t just mean a walking set, but the other accessories that will make your dog walks go smoothly. Some items that we’d suggest you take include the following: • Training Treats - always reward good behaviour • Throwing Toy - perfect for the park or beach when it’s quiet • Small Travel Bag - Depending on how long you’re out, it might be worth taking a travel bowl with some fresh water and even some dry food. Your dog may well work up an appetite. • Drying Coat - if your dog likes a splash in the water and you’re going to the beach a drying coat is a great way to keep them warm and dry on the way home. • Dog Coat - Don’t forget those April Showers. A good quality dog coat may be an essential accessory at this time of year. We hope we’ve given you some great ideas for your upcoming walks. Take note of the hazards we mention and, with a little planning, we’re sure you and your dog will be enjoying some wonderful walks this Spring.

By Zac Girdlestone

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Top 10 Dog Friendly Beaches
06.03.23 March 06, 2023 Owning a Dog Featured

Top 10 Dog Friendly Beaches

If you're anything like us, as soon as the weather gets warmer you're looking for fun days out to go on with your dog. One of our favourite dog-friendly trips is to the beach, however, not all beaches are geared up day trips with your dogs. Here we look our top ten dog-friendly beaches in the UK so you can plan your next seaside adventure with your dog.   Our Top 10 Beaches For Dog Walking  1. Holkham Bay, Norfolk A beautiful sandy beach on the Norfolk coast, Holkham is perfect for a walk with your dog. In fact, there are miles of unspoiled coastline here to enjoy a long adventure with your canine family members. At low tide, the beach stretches a mile from the entrance to the sea so there's plenty of space for your dogs to run around. There's a lot of nature to spot including birds and seals. The beach has such a peaceful feel with the nature reserve that runs alongside the sand and the sunsets are beautiful.   2. Lunan Bay, Scotland Lunan Bay has a lot to offer including a gorgeous cliff-lined edge and endless sandy beaches. As well as a great opportunity for a good walk, there are other things to see too, including a cave, the ruins of Red Castle and a bird hide for the ornithologists amongst you. You may even catch a glimpse of dolphins in the water on a clear day. The beach is also popular with surfers and horse riders. This is a great option if you're looking for a dog-friendly beach trip, it has free parking and the local diner is also dog friendly so why not stop by for a coffee and a cake after your walk?   3. Freshwater West Beach, Wales A wide, open sandy beach that is popular with surfers, you wouldn't be wrong for thinking that Freshwater West Beach looks familiar. The beach has actually been used in several films, from Ridley Scott's Robin Hood to Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, it's definitely worth a visit especially if you're a film buff! Freshwater West Beach is dog friendly all year round and perfect for your next coastal adventure with your dog.   4. Whitely Bay, North Tyneside In the North of England sits Whitley Bay. A blue flag award-winning beach punctuated by St Mary’s Lighthouse, it is perfect for dog walks and picnics, there are also plenty of dog-friendly cafes and pubs around if you want to stop for a drink after your dog walk. Dogs are allowed on the section north of Panama Gardens all year round and the rest of the beach between September and May.   5. Dunster Beach, Somerset Located on the edge of Exmoor is Dunster Beach; a wide beach of sand and pebble. It’s a super popular choice for walkers as the 25-mile West Somerset Coastal path runs through it. So not only is this the ideal beach for a casual stroll and a paddle, but is ideal if you’re a walking enthusiast and looking for a more adventurous walk with your dog. There are plenty of car parks here for your visit, but it’s also possible to drive right up the beach in places too - just take note of how busy it is as it’s a popular spot.   6. Climping, Sussex A quiet rural beach on the Sussex beach. Climping (or Atherington as it’s also known) is predominantly shingle with a good stretch of sand at low tide. The beach has been identified as a “Site of Special Scientific Interest” so some of the sand dunes are now fenced off to help prevent erosion   7. Sandymouth, Cornwall This is a really beautiful cliff-lined beach that sits in-between Bude and Morwenstow, in Cornwall. It’s a dramatic landscape and perfect for an afternoon out. A predominantly pebble beach with sand exposed as the sea retreats, there is something here for everyone; if you’re looking for a more adventurous ramble with your canine companions you might like to try a walk along the South West Coast Path that runs along the cliff top. For a more relaxed day out, a stroll along the water’s edge and a paddle might be more suitable. There are lots of rock pools to look for creatures in, cliffs and caves to explore, there really is something for everyone! Parking is free for National Trust Members as well!   8. Theddlethorpe, Lincolnshire Theddlethorpe is one of our favourites here at L&L, the dunes here are designated a National Nature Reserve and it's simply stunning. The tide never comes fully in so you don't have to worry about the water and it's one of the quieter beaches in the area. The beach is definitely one for nature lovers with its unspoiled sands and salt marshland, there are so many different habitats here for animals to thrive in!   9. Embleton Bay, Northumberland The views in Embleton Bay are stunning, the dramatic coastline has a rugged, romantic feel to it. Embleton Bay is great for both sightseeing and dog walks, the 14th-century Dunstanburgh Castle ruins are at one end with miles of golden sandy beaches snaking up to them   10. Three Cliffs Bay, Gower Peninsula  These are one of the most photographed beaches in Britain and it's easy to see why! It's spectacularly beautiful with a freshwater stream running through it and lined with sand dunes, it's one of the quieter beaches in the area. There's a 400m walk to get onto the beach but we promise it's worth it!   Things to Remember When Taking Your Dog to the Beach Research before you go Every beach is different and so researching the spot you intend to visit is really important. Some beaches will have certain restrictions such as certain times of the year when dogs might not be allowed. Some may ask that your dog is on a lead at all times whilst others will be more relaxed. Be prepared so you can make the most of your day.   Take provisions There are some obvious items you should take such as your dogs walking set and some poo bags, but also think about what else you might need. If you’re going to be out for an extended period you might take some drinking water and a pet travel bowl for them. A drying coat might be an essential if your dog is a water lover and is likely to venture into the sea. You might take some outdoor dog toys to add some playtime fun to the day trip. If you’re planning a full day out with a long car journey, maybe invest in a good travel bag for your dog with travel feeding bowls and accessories. That way your dog can join in with a picnic. Our other beach essential is a first aid kit, the Charlie The Vet kits are one of our travel essentials!   Be aware of other people If there are a few people about and your dog is likely to run off, then you may consider keeping them on a lead for the whole time you’re at the beach, even if it’s not a requirement of the beach you’re visiting. Practicing good pet etiquette makes the time enjoyable for both you, your pets and everyone else on the beach. Longline leads are great for giving your pets the freedom to roam without you having to worry about where they are wondering off to.    Pick up your dog’s waste You may think it less important to pick up your dog’s poo when on the beach; it can be buried in the sand or washed away by the sea, but that’s not the case. It’s just as important to pick up your dog’s mess here as in any other location. Dog waste contains harmful bacteria and causes harm to sea life, children playing in the sea and people walking on the beach. Always clean up after your dog!   Be mindful of the local wildlife You may see all kinds of wildlife depending on the particular coastline you are visiting. If your dog has a tendency to chase birds or other animals it may be best to keep them on their lead. It isn’t fair for other animals to be chased unnecessarily. In some ares there will be restricted areas for nesting and endangered wildlife. Whilst you may know not to enter, your wandering dog won’t know the difference. Take care and control your dog. You want the day to be pleasant for all, human and animal alike.   Be mindful of heatstroke If you're planning to go on a warmer day make sure you consider whether it's too warm for your dog. It will typically be a little cooler on the beach but just check the forecast before you go to keep your dog safe!

By Megan Willis

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How To Travel With A Dog In A Car
06.02.23 February 06, 2023 Owning a Dog Featured

How To Travel With A Dog In A Car

We’re getting to that time of year again where we’re travelling more with our pets to the beach, staycations and even trips to a different location for a long walk. No matter how long the journey - even if it’s a trip to the local vets - you should ensure your dog is properly restrained and safe to travel. Here in the UK it’s the law when travelling by car your dog needs to be restrained. In this blog, we breakdown how to travel safely with your pet.   What Is The Law With Dogs In Cars? The Highway Code states in their Rules about Animals, when in a vehicle, dogs are to be suitably restrained so they cannot distract you while you’re driving or injure you, or themselves, if you should need to stop quickly. If you were in an accident caused by your dog distracting you whilst you were driving, this could be considered as ‘dangerous driving’. It’s also good to check your insurance policy, as car insurance providers may require you to restrain your pet.   Is It The Law To Restrain A Dog In A Car? It is the law to restrain your dog when travelling in your car. So as fun as it is for your pooch to sit with their head out of the window, they must be suitably restrained so they cannot distract you and potentially hurt either you or themselves. When it comes to where your dog should be when travelling, although there are no laws against your dog travelling in the footwell of the car, unfortunately they would not be properly restrained and if you did have an accident, you may be prosecuted for ‘dangerous driving’. When choosing where your dog should be properly restrained, no matter what method you choose, your dog should not sit in the front seat - securing them in the boot or back seat behind a front seat is considered a safer option.   How To Secure A Dog In The Car There are many safety products you can choose from, which can help with travelling safely in the car. It’s most important you choose a solution that’s suitable and comfortable for your pooch, and it has been installed and executed correctly to ensure the safety of your pet. Here at Lords & Labradors, we’d recommend the following for safe travel.   Dog Carriers Our pet carriers come in different sizes and weights which will vary for the suitability for you and your dog. It’s a lighter option to our metal crates and are easily packed away if you’re staying away from home. Carriers are great when travelling by car and when taking your dog from the car into a safe place to let them out and stretch  their legs. They keep your pooch safe and settled whilst travelling.   Travel Harnesses Our pet-friendly harnesses come in a variety of sizes, suitable to your dogs breed and size. Travel harnesses are easy to fit onto your dog and it’s quick to clip them into place. They’re specially designed to prevent your dog from moving around whilst in the car, all whilst keeping your pet safe and comfortably restrained.   Travel Crates Crating your dog keeps them safe & secure - using a crate to transport your pet has the added benefit if they’re already used to being crated at home. If your dog is used to being crated, often when travelling they’ll feel safer and their surroundings will reduce any anxiety your dog may have around travelling.   How Long Can A Dog Travel In A Car Being stuck in the car can be hard for your dog! Not only will your dog need regular toilet breaks, they’ll also need to stretch their legs and get some of their energy out. When stopping for your dog to toilet and stretch their legs, you could also give them some food and water to avoid any spillages whilst travelling. Ideally you should try to keep to your dogs routine where possible (even when travelling) - every 2 to 4 hours for about 15 to 30 minutes is a good guide to follow, however you’ll know what is best for your dog and how they travel. If you’re planning a lengthy trip, try to go on few shorter journeys to see how your dog is likely to react.

By Megan Willis

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